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The world is changing. People are finally learning how to manage their own human experiences. But we can't do it alone. Christy Maxey is here to guide you on the path to a positive, guilt-free life. If you're ready to look inward, find peace, and develop the skills to love your true self, you're in the right place. After all, you've been suffering long enough.

When you work with Christy, you'll be on a fast track to the truth - no beating around the bush or wasting time. Christy's methods are gentle but firm, compassionate yet driven. You will learn, you will transform, and you will be happy because it's you who did the work. It's time to face your fears head-on, so you can't play the victim card anymore. You're capable of great relationships, healthy self-confidence, and of doing something with your life. If you're sick and tired of being stuck, this is your chance to get out of that rut.

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Latest News in Wickenburg, AZ

No arms, no legs, no excuses: Wickenburg (Arizona) football coach Carter Crosland sees no obstacles

WICKENBURG, Ariz. — On most days, usually a little after 3, the man in the wide-brim straw hat, with no arms and legs, can be seen around town driving his wheelchair to get to Wickenburg High School's football practice.Living on the other end of town, it takes 37-year-old Carter Crosland 30 to 45 minutes to get there to assist head coach Ishmael MacNeil's team as a defensive assistant. Earlier in the summer, he would catch a ride from his cousin, Carson Hone, a defensive lineman on the team, who would put Crosland...

WICKENBURG, Ariz. — On most days, usually a little after 3, the man in the wide-brim straw hat, with no arms and legs, can be seen around town driving his wheelchair to get to Wickenburg High School's football practice.

Living on the other end of town, it takes 37-year-old Carter Crosland 30 to 45 minutes to get there to assist head coach Ishmael MacNeil's team as a defensive assistant. Earlier in the summer, he would catch a ride from his cousin, Carson Hone, a defensive lineman on the team, who would put Crosland's chair on the back of his truck.

But now that school is in session, Hone can't pick him up, so Crosland is on his own getting to the school for practices.

He never misses.

On this day, it's 103 degrees and feels hotter with the sun bearing down with the higher-than-usual humidity, but Crosland didn't complain about the cross-town trek.

"I'll cruise home when practice is over probably," Crosland said. "It takes another half hour to get there. But that's all right. It's nice when it starts cooling down.

"I try not to make excuses. If I can get here by myself, then they can get here."

Crosland was born in Utah without arms and legs, so this is "normal" to him, getting around on a motorized chair. His iPhone sits on his left shoulder and a touchpad is near his other right shoulder that directs his wheelchair.

"I think I would rather have it this way," Crosland said. "I don't know any different, so I don't know what it's like to have arms and legs. This is normal to me. I have a cousin who lost both of his legs, one below the knee and the other above the knee. Some of the things he's gone through, I'm glad I haven't gone through that.

"Once in a while, I think about what it would be like if I had arms and legs. But it doesn't do me any good to dwell on it. I can't change it, so I might as well make the best of it, for sure."

Crosland lives a productive life with his wife, who babysits MacNeil's kids during the day.

He owns his home. He works from home as a landscape designer for a national company. His move from central Utah to Wickenburg was prompted by family, familiarity with the state and his desire to get away from the cold winters. He had lived in Chandler for a couple of years, before returning to Utah.

He moved to Wickenburg last year, knowing he would have help with his aunt and uncle living there and his grandparents spending winters there. It was too late to join the high school team, so he helped out on the youth level.

"I came here often to visit them," Crosland said. "When COVID hit (in 2020) and I started working from home full-time, it was time to get back to Arizona, because I don't like snow. Get away from the snow, and life is good."

Inspired by his high school football coach, who took him in as an honorary member of the team, Crosland had helped coach in Utah at the youth, high school and college levels, even semi-professional.

"The coach I had growing up was awesome and I loved football," said Crosland, who got his degree from Southern Utah.

Crosland spends hours breaking down film. He lends insight that the head coach may not see.

When MacNeil was promoted from assistant coach to replace Mike Mitchell in June, MacNeil took on Crosland as an assistant, impressed by his ability to get around town in his chair and his desire to coach.

"The kids know he's always going to be here," MacNeil said. "He makes that sacrifice to get here no matter what. Right now, it's blazing hot in that chair. But he gets here every day."

Crosland has become an inspiration in Wickenburg, including to his cousins, Carter and Jaxson Hone. Carter is a junior and Jaxson, a backup quarterback, is a sophomore.

"I see him driving that thing all around town," Jaxson said. "He has the willpower to do that even in a wheelchair.

"Coming out here every day, even though he doesn't need to, it's amazing. He wants to be exactly like everyone is treated here."

Carson has grown up witnessing a man full of fight and no excuses to prevent him from accomplishing whatever he set his mind to.

"He would wrestle with us when we were little kids on the trampoline," Carson Hone said. "I watched him kick my little brother's butt."

Crosland doesn't want anyone to feel sorry for him.

"I've never heard him say, 'I can't do something,' " Carson Hone said.

That's the mindset he has taken every day in his life, growing up in Fillmore, Utah, a town smaller than Wickenburg, learning from his grandfather, who was an all-state running back in Utah and a two-time state wrestling champion.

"Everyone is doing it, so I might as well, too," he said.

There was no frustration that he couldn't be on the field with everybody else during games.

"I think there would have been had I not been as included as I was," he said. "But I never felt like that. I was able to captain a couple of games my senior year, too. So that was cool."

A communications major to start college, he wanted to be a broadcaster and called a couple of games on the radio. He had his own sports show. But his future brother-in-law, a car salesman, sold a car to a local high school football coach. That's how he got involved in coaching while going to college. He convinced him to change his major to history.

He calls himself a film junkie. He said he would like to someday be a head coach. But he says he's not ready now.

"I just want the players to know that it doesn't matter if you come from a small school," Crosland said. "Everybody's got their own story. Everybody's got their own issues they're dealing with. I just try to be a motivator. Try to let them know that regardless of their background or what their story is, if they want to do it, they can.

"There is nothing that is stopping them, except for themselves."

Nothing has ever stopped Crosland.

To suggest human-interest story ideas and other news, reach Obert at richard.obert@arizonarepublic.com or 602-316-8827. Follow him on Twitter @azc_obert.

State, Cox bringing in broadband

Special to The SunThe Arizona Commerce Authority has announced its 2022 Arizona Broadband Development Grant recipients, awarding $5 million for Cox Communications to upgrade and expand its all-fiber and coaxial cable network in Wickenburg using state-of-the art technology.Cox will invest an additional $3,411,000 for this Wickenburg project that will provide more than 5,200 residents and businesses with upgraded and/or new internet service. Residents will have access to internet speeds of up to 1 Gig and busines...

Special to The Sun

The Arizona Commerce Authority has announced its 2022 Arizona Broadband Development Grant recipients, awarding $5 million for Cox Communications to upgrade and expand its all-fiber and coaxial cable network in Wickenburg using state-of-the art technology.

Cox will invest an additional $3,411,000 for this Wickenburg project that will provide more than 5,200 residents and businesses with upgraded and/or new internet service. Residents will have access to internet speeds of up to 1 Gig and businesses up to 10 Gig symmetrical speeds.

The Cox plan will call for the extension of network along US Highway 60 from Surprise through Wickenburg to include Rancho de los Caballeros, Las Casitas San Juan Central, and Vista Royale, utilizing the deployment of both fiber and coaxial cable. Looking to the near future, Cox’s fiber to the premises upgrade will create a pathway to the next big milestone in residential speeds – 10 Gigabit.

In addition to its financial investment in Wickenburg, Cox will also invest in the community through the contribution of:

The project is expected to be completed within 24 months.

“We look forward to working with the Cox team and thank the company for its continued investment in our community. Wickenburg extends our appreciation to the Arizona Commerce Authority and to State of Arizona Representative Joanne Osborne of Legislative District 13 for her commitment to expanding high-speed broadband infrastructure to include small communities. Access to Gig broadband speeds will provide reliable, high-quality internet service to many unserved and underserved Wickenburg residents, while expanding opportunities for economic development and jobs in our community,” Wickenburg Mayor Rui Pereira said.

Cox will begin engineering, construction design and necessary permitting for upgrade and expansion and will be working with local, state, and federal agencies to obtain necessary approvals. Residents in Wickenburg will soon see work commencing in their community and can visit https://www.cox.com/getfiber to obtain status updates and express interest in Cox services.

Building upon its longstanding efforts to bridge the digital divide, Cox is committing more than $400 million over the next three years to expand its footprint to reach underserved and rural communities across the country. Cox has already committed more than $60 million to date to expand to Arizona communities including Arizona City, the City of Maricopa, San Manuel, Oracle, Black Canyon City, Congress, Huachuca City, Sun Lakes, SE Sierra Vista, Eloy, Toltec, Desert Hills, Douglas and Summit View.

“Connectivity is at the heart of everything we do. Our Arizona team has been focused on providing the most powerful high-speed internet to underserved/unserved communities across our state. We thank the Arizona Commerce Authority their partnership and for putting their confidence in Cox to bring important services to the residents in Wickenburg," said Percy Kirk, Senior Vice President and Southwest Regional Manager, Cox Communications.

Cox will make every effort to minimize the construction impact and when possible, will communicate the expansion and progress of their work with residents through local media, and direct communications from Cox.

Master the art of the interview

By ARIZONA@WORKMaricopa CountyAn interview with a potential employer is one of the most important aspects of a job search. For many people, it can also be one of the most daunting.Jobseekers who would like to build new interview skills, refresh skills they may not have used for a long time, or even practice interviewing can turn to Maricopa County’s ARIZONA@WORK program for assistance, which is available at no cost."Maricopa County is committed to supporting the local job market any way we can, and that...

By ARIZONA@WORK

Maricopa County

An interview with a potential employer is one of the most important aspects of a job search. For many people, it can also be one of the most daunting.

Jobseekers who would like to build new interview skills, refresh skills they may not have used for a long time, or even practice interviewing can turn to Maricopa County’s ARIZONA@WORK program for assistance, which is available at no cost.

"Maricopa County is committed to supporting the local job market any way we can, and that includes helping job seekers get the skills and confidence they need to make a great first impression," said Supervisor Clint Hickman, who represents Wickenburg and the rest of District 4. "Gain interview skills at no cost to you by visiting our ARIZONA@WORK office at the Wickenburg Library."

Julie Pellam, Workforce Development Coordinator in Wickenburg, said it’s common for people to be nervous about being interviewed.

“One of the best ways to combat the nervousness they feel is simply to be well-prepared,” she said.

Lucy was ready to take the next step in her career, but when Lucy was ready to start applying for positions, she felt unprepared when it came to meeting employers and answering their questions. She turned to the Maricopa County ARIZONA@WORK program located inside the Wickenburg Library and Julie was there to help.

First, Pellam directed Lucy to the “Virtual Employment Academy,” a free workshop offered by Maricopa County ARIZONA@WORK that includes a module dedicated to enhancing interviewing skills. The two- hour training is conducted online and teaches participants how to better prepare for interviews such as anticipating the common types of questions that recruiters ask. Participants are introduced to commonly asked interview questions, behavioral questions and questions that use the STAR methodology, an interview technique that requires the candidate to use a particular Situation, Task, Action and Result from their own personal experience to answer a question.

Once Lucy had learned the basics of interviewing, Pellam provided one-on-one assistance to help her craft answers to the commonly asked interview questions that would reflect that Lucy had the skills called for in the job description, addressing the needs of the employer. She helped Lucy work through the questions and answers through a mock interview so she could practice answering the questions. Not only was this a great way to become familiar with the interviewing process- practice helps quash the butterflies!

The more Lucy prepared and practiced, the more comfortable she became with the thought of interviewing. Lucy’s answers became more focused and her body language reflected her newfound sense of confidence.

“Interviewing is not just an opportunity for the employer to learn about your skills and experience, it’s an opportunity for them to determine how you will fit into their workplace culture,” Pellam said. “We can help you prepare for the conversation with great answers and showcase your soft skills such as communication, adaptability and work ethic.”

Ever wonder what it is like on the other side of the table during a job interview? Amy Bolton with the Maricopa County Office of Communications has served on four interview panels so far in 2022.

“When meeting with multiple applicants in a relatively short time, it becomes apparent that some candidates “wing it” and some come prepared,” Bolton said. “When I consider adding someone to my team or make a hiring recommendation to a colleague, the candidates who are engaged, thoughtful, prepared and at ease with the conversation catch my interest because it shows their ability to reason and draw upon their past experience to problem solve.”

Assistance with creating resumes and other job search skills is also provided in Wickenburg through Maricopa County’s ARIZONA@WORK program. To learn more about these services, call (602) 733-2220, visit www.arizonaatwork.com/maricopa, email Julie.Pellam@maricopa.gov or drop by the Workforce Career Center at the Wickenburg Library at 164 E. Apache St.

Community center to host concert Aug. 13

Sun Correspondent Yarnell Regional Community Center’s Concert Series presents Sir Harrison from 3 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 13.The center hosts game night from 3 to 5 p.m. every Monday. Between 11 a.m. and noon every Tuesday, free blood pressure checks are provided by trained professionals from the Yarnell Fire District.Music at lunch will be provided by Wickenburg Ukulele Group “HUG” from 11 a.m. to 11:45 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 26.For more information on any of these community center...

Sun Correspondent

Yarnell Regional Community Center’s Concert Series presents Sir Harrison from 3 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 13.

The center hosts game night from 3 to 5 p.m. every Monday. Between 11 a.m. and noon every Tuesday, free blood pressure checks are provided by trained professionals from the Yarnell Fire District.

Music at lunch will be provided by Wickenburg Ukulele Group “HUG” from 11 a.m. to 11:45 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 26.

For more information on any of these community center events call (928) 427-6347. The center is located at 22302 S. State Route 89 in Yarnell. The thrift store is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Lunch is served in the dining room from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The center and dining room are closed on Sundays.

Yarnell Public Library will present a Yavapai master gardeners talk from 1 to 2 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 26.

The library invites adults who are crafty, or who want to be, to come to the library from 2 to 3 p.m. every third Thursday of each month to join the Krafty Krew. Participants can bring their own crafts projects or work on projects made available by the library. Coffee will be served.

Readers Delight book chat happens from 1 to 2 p.m. at the library every first Wednesday of each month. Readers are invited to come and share their current book.

Call the library at (928) 427-3191 or visit www.ycfld.org/yarnell online to learn more. The library is located at 22278 S. Highway 89 in Yarnell.

Model Creek School will hold a child find session from 9 to 11 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 5. The first day for preschool will be from 7:40 to 10 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 11. Later that same day, from 3 to 4:30 p.m., a school board meeting is scheduled.

The YESD School Governing Board revised the YESD Safe Return to In-Person Instruction Plan: ESSER III on Thursday, July 14, 2022. Please see the changes on the school website. This plan will be reviewed each month at its board meeting. Version 5 of the plan is attached under information and notices on the school website at www.modelcreekschool.org/or call (928) 427-3347.

Communication, via email and the school website, will be provided as needed if the metrics or situation change moving forward. Please see the CDC guidelines for more information and guidance. Masks are optional on campus. From the CDC: “COVID-19 Community Levels are a new tool to help communities decide what COVID-19 prevention steps to take based on the latest data. Levels can be low, medium, or high and are determined by looking at hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new COVID-19 cases in an area. Take precautions to protect yourself and others from COVID-19 based on the COVID-19 Community Level in your area. People with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask. If you are immunocompromised or high risk for severe disease, please use a mask for your safety.”

The district governing board asks that people with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 stay home.

The state of Arizona has a law that will benefit both taxpayers and school children. The tax credit reduces liability by the amount donated. Individuals can donate $200 and married couples can donate $400. The form to use for this credit is Arizona Income Tax form 322. The tax credit form is available on the school website or in the school office.

The school is located at 18912 Hays Ranch Road in Peeples Valley. The school requests supplies of copy paper, Ziploc bags, AAA batteries and Band-Aids.

Bill Chaplin leads tai chi classes from 9 to 10 a.m. every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday at Yarnell Community Presbyterian Church. The church’s creative circle meets from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday in the sewing room. Rebecca Hagman leads yoga classes from 2 to 3 p.m. every Thursday. Kiwanis Club holds meetings led by Tyson Oliver from 5:30 to 7 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. The church is located at 16455 Table Top Way in Yarnell. For more information call (928) 427-3421.

Team ropers pull an all nighter

Staff WriterBy the time the competition finished at 2:45 a.m., Sunrise Roping seemed a more accurate name for the event this past Saturday at Rancho Rio.With a booming 759 total teams entered and an overall payout of $57,800, Yost Events and Rancho Rio’s Sunset Roping set the bar considerably high in its initial run.“This is the first year we’ve offered a summer Sunset Roping at Rancho Rio,” said Kari DeCastro, marketing director for Yost Events. “We often have a set of cattle in an...

Staff Writer

By the time the competition finished at 2:45 a.m., Sunrise Roping seemed a more accurate name for the event this past Saturday at Rancho Rio.

With a booming 759 total teams entered and an overall payout of $57,800, Yost Events and Rancho Rio’s Sunset Roping set the bar considerably high in its initial run.

“This is the first year we’ve offered a summer Sunset Roping at Rancho Rio,” said Kari DeCastro, marketing director for Yost Events. “We often have a set of cattle in and out of Wickenburg throughout the summer months. There are not a lot of roping competitions in the Valley this time of year, for obvious reasons. However, as the sun goes down, the temperature drops just enough to make outdoor activities tolerable.”

Even with the clouds obscuring the setting sun, which theme was so central to the event’s name, the competition offered both a reprieve and a reward for competitors who have remained in the area throughout the hot summer months.

“As Arizona has become the Team Roping Capital of the World, we’ve seen more and more team ropers staying year round,” DeCastro said. “With high fuel prices and the benefit of having cattle on site, we wanted to give that year-round roper somewhere to compete without a big commute.”

Considering the 759 teams were mostly local Arizona ropers, the commute must not have seemed too long for those gunning for the $10,000 “high point roper” grand prize won at the end of the eight-hour competition by Matthew Rivera. The Amado native also split money with Esteban Ruiz and Jesus Celaya for 4th and 12th place on the average respectively. Coming in first in the average were Rio Looper (Chino Valley) and Dillon Wurm (Prescott), who split $10,200.

While the free event served as a test experiment for both crowd and entrant participation, the answer to whether or not more like it will take place before the season kicks off in October was a resounding “Yes” by DeCastro and Yost Events.

“Ropers seemed genuinely thrilled to be there,” DeCastro said. “We are hoping to schedule a couple more sunset events before summer’s end.”

For information on possible upcoming events visit RanchoRioAZ.com or follow @Rancho Rio and @Yost Events on Facebook.

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