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Latest News in Tempe, AZ

The New American president: Crow's relationships with Arizona politicians

When Michael Crow became the 16th president of ASU in 2002, Neil Giuliano, former mayor of Tempe from 1994 to 2004, saw the immense impact Crow could have not only on the University, but on Tempe and Arizona as a whole.Giuliano worked with Crow before he came to Arizona, while the soon-to-be ASU president was still working at Columbia University. Giuliano worked as the director of federal and community relations at ASU before and during his tenure as mayor, and said he collaborated with Crow and his colleagues at Columbia.In th...

When Michael Crow became the 16th president of ASU in 2002, Neil Giuliano, former mayor of Tempe from 1994 to 2004, saw the immense impact Crow could have not only on the University, but on Tempe and Arizona as a whole.

Giuliano worked with Crow before he came to Arizona, while the soon-to-be ASU president was still working at Columbia University. Giuliano worked as the director of federal and community relations at ASU before and during his tenure as mayor, and said he collaborated with Crow and his colleagues at Columbia.

In the 20 years since, other local and state leaders have, sometimes begrudgingly, seen the impact Crow has had on ASU and the communities it inhabits. He has integrated himself into nearly every facet of Arizona politics, cultivating relationships with most political entities in the state, from the city of Tempe and the Arizona Board of Regents, to the state Legislature and the governor’s office.

“He was seen as radical because higher ed hadn’t changed before,” said Mary Venezia, a student regent from NAU on ABOR during Crow’s early years at the University. “Now I think when we look back at those ideas that he had, he was really thinking way ahead of everyone else in the higher ed industry.”

Early on, Crow formed an alliance with then-gubernatorial candidate Janet Napolitano to enact one of his many changes at ASU. She said the two met while she was distributing campaign flyers outside an AJ’s Fine Foods in Scottsdale. Crow approached the store in flip flops and shorts, she said. He and his wife were stocking up on groceries after just moving to Arizona and happened to run into Napolitano.

Shortly after, while still campaigning, Napolitano pledged to support Crow in his search for alternative funding methods for the University as the state suffered cuts to education funding.

“It was always a challenge at the Legislature particularly to get adequate funding for the state universities,” she said. “So we’ve worked together quite a bit on that. And then he reached out to city leaders and really, by working with the municipalities, got help that the state Legislature wouldn’t provide.”

Giuliano said lawmakers really began to see Crow’s drive in 2004, when Crow approached him and other local and state leaders about holding the third presidential debate between then-incumbent President George W. Bush and then-Sen. John Kerry on the Tempe campus. It was an ambitious undertaking for a University president so new to the state and its political inner workings, Giuliano said.

On Oct. 13, 2004, Crow and representatives of the Commission on Presidential Debates gave the opening remarks of the debate at Gammage Auditorium. According to State Press coverage at the time, 3,000 tickets were given out for the debate at Gammage, 300 of which went to students. 10,000 tickets were given to students for a viewing party at Wells Fargo Arena — now known as Desert Financial Arena — and other students participated in protests or rallies around campus.

By taking on the challenge of hosting a high-profile presidential debate, Crow let local and state lawmakers know he had large ambitions for the future of ASU, Giuliano said. So, when the University began expanding further into Tempe and other parts of the state in the years following, Giuliano wasn’t surprised.

ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus broadened the University’s reach in 2006, followed by SkySong the ASU Scottsdale Innovation Center in 2008. By 2014, the University had opened ASU Colleges at Lake Havasu City. The expansion continued with ASU breaking ground on ASU at Mesa City Center in 2020.

The University even expanded outside of Arizona in 2013 and 2018, by opening facilities in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., respectively. Although ASU had a presence in Washington since the early 2010s, it didn’t establish a D.C. headquarters until 2018.

“Most of us knew that the full aspiration of the University’s potential was not to be confined by the borders of the city of Tempe,” Giuliano said. “There’s a larger constituency, there’s a larger need in other parts of this region, for the University to serve the community, and to help educate the future of Arizona.”

Amid the early expansion of the University, Venezia was beginning her work as a student regent on ABOR. ABOR is the governing body that oversees Arizona’s three public universities. The board is made up of eight regents and two student regents — all of whom are appointed by the governor — and the current governor and superintendent of public instruction as two ex-officio members.

Working as a student regent demanded some butting of heads with Crow and the other university presidents, Venezia recalled. In 2008, she was working with the Arizona Students’ Association on a proposed tuition freeze that would offer fixed tuition to students at all state universities for four years, a proposal championed by Napolitano.

Crow has long been an opponent of tuition freezes. At a student forum in fall 2021, Crow said the University had only raised tuition about 2% over the last 10 years, making it cheaper than other Arizona universities like UA, which has a Guaranteed Tuition Program that freezes tuition for eight consecutive semesters.

Ultimately, the 2008 tuition freeze didn’t come to pass. But Venezia helped find a compromise by negotiating with the university presidents to keep tuition as low as possible.

Even though the tuition freeze initiative failed, Venezia said she gained a lot of respect for and insight from Crow while working at ABOR — inspiring her to continue working within higher education.

“A lot of the ideas that he brought to the board, and what ASU was doing, were seen as very different. Higher education in general hasn’t changed in forever,” Venezia said. “Michael Crow came in and was like, ‘Hey, let’s change this up. If there’s ways that we can be more efficient, we can support students better.’”

In the years since, Crow has gone toe-to-toe with regents on other issues. At a budget meeting in June 2021, Crow reminded the board of ASU’s independence from ABOR and state funding.

“We do serve the public and are governed by this board, but we operate in a modality where we seek partnerships, we seek revenue and mechanisms to generate revenue,” Crow said at the time.

Other public officials took issue with Crow and his out-of-the-box ideas, according to former regent Mark Killian, who served on the board from 2010 to 2015.

“Some people at the Legislature, sometimes the governors, get their nose out of joint because a university president is strident in their advocacy to protect universities and what they do,” Killian said.

In February 2022, Crow took a jab at state legislators during his State of the University presentation to ABOR, saying the University “failed at convincing the state to make investments in the public universities, at least our public universities at the level that we think is merited.”

Napolitano was one lawmaker Crow was said to have a tense relationship with. Despite their early alliance, the two clashed in the later years of Napolitano’s tenure over issues like the proposed tuition freeze, with rumors that Napolitano threw Crow out of her office at one point.

“We both have strong personalities,” Napolitano said. “And yeah, occasionally we had differences of opinion, and we always worked through them.”

Napolitano and Killian agreed that Crow always did what he thought was best for the University, even if that meant duking it out with Arizona’s top political players and government officials.

“The legislative process is adversarial and you have people with strong views on either side,” Killian said. “So you can get caught up in those disagreements, but I think what Michael has done has been perfectly appropriate.”

Despite the sometimes contentious relationships, current ABOR Chair Lyndel Manson said the regents have great respect for Crow and fully support his ambitions for the future of ASU. Manson said she admires Crow’s commitment to making higher education accessible, a goal outlined in ASU’s charter.

“He is very consistent with his message, he is very consistent with his efforts to increase attainment, to increase accessibility,” Manson said. “He walks the talk.”

Manson highlighted this and the University’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic as prime examples of Crow’s leadership. She called Crow’s lengthy tenure as ASU’s president “an incredible testament to his leadership” given that higher education leadership remain in their positions for less than a decade on average.

“And I certainly wouldn’t expect him to slow down,” Manson said. “I don’t think that’s in his personality.”‌‌

This story is part of "The Crow Issue," a State Press Magazine project looking back at the past 20 years of Michael Crow's tenure as University president. See the entire publication here.

Reach the reporter at rpriest2@asu.edu and follow @reaganspriest on Twitter.

Like The State Press on Facebook and follow @statepress on Twitter.‌‌

Sprouts Farmers Market Aligns with Arizona State University, University of California, Los Angeles, University of Southern California, and University of Texas to Empower Women’s Sports and Health

PHOENIX, Sept. 13, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sprouts Farmers Market today announced a complement to its long-term commitment and investment to women’s athletics through individual sponsorship agreements with the athletics departments for Arizona State University, Univ...

PHOENIX, Sept. 13, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sprouts Farmers Market today announced a complement to its long-term commitment and investment to women’s athletics through individual sponsorship agreements with the athletics departments for Arizona State University, University of California, Los Angeles, University of Southern California and University of Texas. Sprouts will sponsor season-long activity and entitlement games across the four schools, as well as sponsor one female student-athlete from each institution.

“Through these partnerships, and after celebrating the anniversary of Title IX, we pledge to continue to empower and educate women’s health and performance, bringing fresh and nutritional food options to them on and off the playing field,” said Jack Sinclair, chief executive officer of Sprouts. “We’re also proud to align our brand with talented, hard-working female student-athletes at these four outstanding universities.”

This announcement coincides with Sprouts recent women’s sport announcement.

About Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc. Sprouts is the place where goodness grows. True to its farm-stand heritage, Sprouts offers a unique grocery experience featuring an open layout with fresh produce at the heart of the store. Sprouts inspires wellness naturally with a carefully curated assortment of better-for-you products paired with purpose-driven people. The healthy grocer continues to bring the latest in wholesome, innovative products made with lifestyle-friendly ingredients such as organic, plant-based and gluten-free. Headquartered in Phoenix, and one of the largest and fastest growing specialty retailers of fresh, natural and organic food in the United States, Sprouts employs approximately 31,000 team members and operates approximately 380 stores in 23 states nationwide. This year Sprouts celebrates its 20th anniversary. To learn more about Sprouts, and the good it brings communities, visit about.sprouts.com.

The individual sponsorships with Sprouts and the schools were secured by the respective athletics multimedia rightsholder. Texas and UCLA are represented by LEARFIELD. Arizona State is represented by Pac-12 MMR and USC is represented by Playfly.

ASU Football: How NFL Devils did in Week 1

For much of America, it is like experiencing Christmas morning in September.Week 1 of the NFL season can conjure the same emotions in adults they first experienced as children, and for fans of the Arizona State football program there were a few alums who starred on Saturdays and now appear to be displaying their talents on Sundays as well.Here’s a quick look at how some notable former Sun Devils performed in Week 1.Eno Benjamin - RB - Arizona Cardinals Only Cardinals quarterback Kyler Murray...

For much of America, it is like experiencing Christmas morning in September.

Week 1 of the NFL season can conjure the same emotions in adults they first experienced as children, and for fans of the Arizona State football program there were a few alums who starred on Saturdays and now appear to be displaying their talents on Sundays as well.

Here’s a quick look at how some notable former Sun Devils performed in Week 1.

Eno Benjamin - RB - Arizona Cardinals

Only Cardinals quarterback Kyler Murray ran for more yards than Benjamin in the Cardinals first game. That isn’t saying too much, however, as the real estate was tough to come by on the ground all afternoon for the Cardinals in a 44-21 loss at home to the Kansas City Chiefs.

Benjamin finished with 28 yards on four carries. Similar to his dynamic abilities as a Sun Devil, he was also a threat as a pass-catcher, where he caught three of his four targets for 33 yards.

The best play of the day for Benjamin was his last touch. He took a swing pass from Murray and scurried past a defender to pick up 22 yards and set Arizona up with a 1st & Goal.

This is all very encouraging stuff for Benjamin. His role was expected to increase this season with the departure of Chase Edmonds to Miami, and Benjamin proved Sunday he can be a nice complement to RB1 James Conner in Arizona.

Rachaad White - RB - Tampa Bay Buccaneers

While the game between the Buccaneers and the Cowboys wasn’t very entertaining, it was a cool moment for Sun Devil fans when Rachaad White checked in the game and lined up in the shotgun formation, flanking Tom Brady.

Brady obviously has little to no input as to who Tampa Bay selects in the NFL Draft, but this selection of White was clearly made with Brady in mind. The legendary quarterback loves versatile running backs who can run routes and catch passes. That is White to a T.

Outside of established veteran Leonard Fournette, nobody touched the rock as much as White. The rookie caught two passes and ran the ball six times for 21 total yards.

An inauspicious debut, but one where White was on the field for over 25% of the snaps. In a notable twist, reports from Bucs world are that Fournette may have injured his hamstring last Sunday. White could be in line for an increased role against the Saints.

Fournette being listed with a hamstring is concerning, but he wasn’t even held out today, which suggests it isn’t that significant. https://t.co/b4lyl1IIHw

— Greg Auman (@gregauman) September 14, 2022

Brandon Aiyuk - WR - San Francisco 49ers

The 49ers grappled with offensive struggles and nearly impossible challenges from the elements all day, but Brandon Aiyuk still managed to produce in a losing effort for San Francisco.

Aiyuk caught four of his seven targets for 45 yards. His longest catch of the day went for 23 yards early in the contest.

This game was won by Chicago, but the 49ers passing attack was completely neutralized in the fourth quarter in the midst of a torrential downpour. Receivers just aren’t going to perform well when the field looks like a wet airport tarmac.

Unfortunately for the 49ers, rain is the forecast again this weekend. But with top running back Elijah Mitchell out for several weeks, Aiyuk’s role could increase even more in this offense.

Some scribbles on some others....

- Zane Gonzalez, the placekicker for the Carolina Panthers in 2020 and 2021 , suffered a season-ending groin injury in August.

- Darien Butler impressed his coaching staff during camp. While Butler didn’t see the field in Week 1, he may get the start in Week 2 as starting LB Denzel Perryman is listed as “questionable” for the game against Arizona.

- D.J. Davidson played in spurts for the New York Giants and recorded two tackles (one solo) in a close win over the Tennessee Titans.

- Chase Lucas (Lions) and Curtis Hodges (Commanders) did not see action on Sunday.

- Lastly, N’Keal Harry’s timeline for his ankle injury continues to track for around an early November return to the Chicago Bears offense.

ASU

+20000

Coulter Shines on Day Two of ANNIKA Intercollegiate

LAKE ELMO, Minn. - Sun Devil Women's Golf came to play as they shined in the second round of the ANNIKA Intercollegiate on Tuesday at Royal Golf Club.The adjustments implemented by Head Coach Missy Farr-Kaye and Associate Head Coach Michelle Estill worked, as Arizona State saw massive improvement from the first to second day. The Maroon...

LAKE ELMO, Minn. - Sun Devil Women's Golf came to play as they shined in the second round of the ANNIKA Intercollegiate on Tuesday at Royal Golf Club.

The adjustments implemented by Head Coach Missy Farr-Kaye and Associate Head Coach Michelle Estill worked, as Arizona State saw massive improvement from the first to second day. The Maroon & Gold cut their total by 15 strokes, firing a 285 (-3) to gain several spots on the teams just ahead of them on the leaderboard. ASU sits in ninth place as a team after finishing with the fifth-best round of the day.

A big reason for the jump was the outstanding play of freshman Beth Coulter, who came through in only her second collegiate round. She carded a 68 (-4) to lead all Sun Devils, climbing 28 spots up the leaderboard and into a tie for 17th place. She is tied with teammate Ashley Menne (E/72), who was steady for the second consecutive day. They weren't the only Sun Devils to shave strokes off their score from yesterday, as both Paula Schulz-Hanssen (E/72) and Grace Summerhays (+1/73) bounced back with counting scores.

Virginia leads as a team as does their individual, Amanda Sambach, with 18 holes left to play. Arizona State look to build on the excellent round when they complete their first tournament of the 2022-23 season tomorrow starting at 6:55 AM MST. Track the scores via the Golfstat leaderboard at the following link.

BACK NINE After beginning their day on hole one yesterday, ASU flipped to start on hole 10 today. It was clear from the start that this was a different Sun Devil team, as Missy Farr-Kaye had her team focused. This best testament to that came in the form of a red-hot start for Beth Coulter. She birdied her first two holes of the day, setting up what would be a spectacular round. Paula Schulz-Hanssen followed suit with a couple birdies of her own, the first two of her Sun Devil career. She finished the back nine under par to kick her day off strong. Calynne Rosholt also managed to card a pair of birdies on the back nine to finish one-over, matching Grace Summerhays' back nine total.

FRONT NINE Arizona State started their day on the back nine, so the front nine represented the final nine holes. It was a strong finish as a team, with ASU finishing two-under down the stretch. Leading the way was freshman Beth Coulter, who played bogey-free golf while burying three birdie putts. She ended on a high note, recording a birdie on two of her final three holes, including the ninth and final hole. Ashley Menne also had three birdies on the front nine, all coming during a torrid six-hole stretch. Grace Summerhays was extremely consistent on her front nine, avoiding any mistakes and carding all pars. Paula Schulz-Hanssen joined Coulter in birdieing the final hole, giving her momentum heading into Wednesday's final round.

QUOTABLES "We played really well today. What a difference from day-to-day improving by 15-shots. I love the resilience of this team and we worked hard yesterday after the round and worked on a few things that we struggled with. We came back and they played solid and they know they can play better. It's a great place to be. We have a long way to go for the season but I'm really proud of how they played today and they did a great job. We look forward to one more day tomorrow. We're going to keep learning and its terrific to be here at the ANNIKA. We look forward to a great last day tomorrow.

TEAM STANDINGS INDIVIDUAL STANDINGS

UP NEXT Arizona State will begin the final round of the ANNIKA Intercollegiate tomorrow morning at 6:55 AM MST.

HOW TO FOLLOW For the latest updates and information on the Sun Devil Women's Golf program, follow our Twitter/Instagram accounts (@SunDevilWGolf), like our Facebook page (facebook.com/sundevilwgolf/), and visit our website (thesundevils.com). Follow @ANNIKA_Fdn, @RoyalGolfClubMN, and @3M for additional behind-the-scenes content.

New Tempe Restaurant: Anoche Cantina

Anoche Cantina, a new Tempe restaurant and nightlife concept brought to the Valley from Ascend Hospitality Group (AHG), is now open on Mill Avenue. Craving a unique take on the taco? You’re in luck!Anoche Cantina (anoche meaning “last night” in Spanish) is the first Arizona-based concept from AHG — ...

Anoche Cantina, a new Tempe restaurant and nightlife concept brought to the Valley from Ascend Hospitality Group (AHG), is now open on Mill Avenue. Craving a unique take on the taco? You’re in luck!

Anoche Cantina (anoche meaning “last night” in Spanish) is the first Arizona-based concept from AHG — a Black- and female-led, independent restaurant group hailing from Bellevue, Wash., with other locations in Washington, Oregon, and Utah. The modern cantina specializes in an innovative Latin-inspired food and beverage program (including an interactive build-your-own margarita bar!) and is home to 5,000 square feet of both indoor and outdoor dining spaces. At night, the Tempe restaurant transforms into a nightlife concept with high-end bottle service and stellar sound and lighting for an energetic, sexy after-hours atmosphere.

But before the party starts, let’s talk eats. Anoche Cantina, which is open from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., dishes up a menu of shareables for the table (think nachos, street corn, queso and even a health-forward crudite and Tajin spread); a quartet of avant garde taquito options; and the Center of Attention (a k a the main entrees). The Center of Attention offerings, which range from classics like Al Pastor and carne asada to “loco” options like Korean beef and buffalo chicken, can be made into two tacos, a burrito, a bowl or a salad. The Sun Devil, with street corn, panko-breaded avocado, red sauce and cotija, is sure to be a popular option thanks to Anoche Cantina’s proximity to Arizona State University.

Since no meal is complete without dessert, the cantina offers two tempting sundaes to choose from: the churro sundae with cinnamon sugar, dulce de leche, ice cream and chocolate sauce, and fresas con crema comprising fresh strawberries, strawberry ice cream, shortbread cookie and whipped cream.

To wash it all down, a margarita is in order. Choose from Anoche’s creative menu of margs, including the dessert-worthy Creamsicle with blanco tequila, Pinnacle Orange Whipped Vodka, triple sec, orange and lime–or build your own. That’s right; you can pick your own toppings (like dried fruit, jalapeno or candy), rim, mix and base for a totally unique tipple.

The perfect way to make it through the mid-week blues is by spending Taco Tuesday at the Tempe restaurant. Every Tuesday, enjoy the following specials from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.: $10 Classico tacos (complete with rice and beans); $9 Classico and $11 Loco margaritas; $5 Dos Equis and Coors Lights; $6 Sour Patch Shots (red or blue); $7 queso or guacamole; and $8 sundaes.

To learn more about Anoche Cantina in Tempe, visit www.anochecantina.com.

640 S. Mill Ave.Tempe, AZ 85281

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