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Latest News in Phoenix, AZ

City of Phoenix Declares Stage 1 Water Alert and Activates Drought Management Plan

​Water Conservation Media Day | Monday, June 6 @ 9 a.m.| 4106 W. La Mirada Drive, Phoenix, AZDue to the shortage of water on the Colorado River caused by overallocation, prolonged drought, and climate change, the City of Phoenix has declared a Stage 1 Water Alert and activated its Drought Management Plan. City of Phoenix Water Ser...

​Water Conservation Media Day | Monday, June 6 @ 9 a.m.| 4106 W. La Mirada Drive, Phoenix, AZ

Due to the shortage of water on the Colorado River caused by overallocation, prolonged drought, and climate change, the City of Phoenix has declared a Stage 1 Water Alert and activated its Drought Management Plan. City of Phoenix Water Services Department Director Troy Hayes made the announcement during a City Council subcommittee presentation​ on Wednesday, June 1.

The City is taking this action to address the mandatory reduction of Colorado River water and deeper cuts that are likely to occur in the future. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has been working with the seven Colorado River Basin states to manage the changing conditions. However, the levels of Lake Powell and Lake Mead continue to fall precipitously, and the projections show conditions will worsen significantly.

A Stage 1 Water Alert occurs when an insufficient supply of water appears likely due to water system or supply limitations. As a result of the declaration, the City will begin an intensive public education and information program to assist all customers in understanding the state of the emergency and the need for voluntary conservation.

During the early stages of stressed water supplies, the City will ask customers to voluntarily reduce their water use in ways that will have minimal impact on their lifestyles. Since most of our water use is outdoors, watering landscape correctly is one of the easiest and most effective ways to conserve water. Finding and fixing leaking faucets and toilets is the simplest way to reduce indoor water use. Voluntary reductions do not require enforcement, and the primary cost to the City will be associated with customer outreach and education. Any costs incurred by customers due to voluntary reductions will be at the customer's discretion and may be offset by lower water bills.

"The situation on the Colorado River is unprecedented, and we are taking it very seriously," said Mayor Kate Gallego. "Each of us is responsible for making simple changes to live more sustainably in the desert environment we call home. The City of Phoenix is committed to reducing water use in city operations and providing the tools residents and businesses need to use this precious resource efficiently."

At a briefing on Friday, May 6, officials with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Arizona Department of Water Resources, and Central Arizona Project delivered a stark assessment of the Colorado River. Colorado River water supplies roughly 40% of the City's water.

"As the drought intensifies, the City continues to innovate new, proactive actions to prepare for even deeper shortages on the Colorado River, which is over-allocated and in decline due to climate change," said Phoenix Water Services Director Troy Hayes. "The City is prepared to implement additional actions, including those described in our Drought Management Plan."

The City has worked hard to develop a sustainable water supply and has been designated by the State as having a 100-year assured water supply. In addition, Phoenix recycles nearly all its wastewater, delivering it for use in agriculture, energy production, urban irrigation, aquifer recharge, and riparian wetland maintenance.

"Our customers have always been our partners in conservation, and we need that more than ever now," said City of Phoenix Water Resources Management Advisor Cynthia Campbell. "We want them to understand what it means to live in a desert and how to use water as efficiently as possible."

Phoenix will continue to plan, invest and conserve to ensure a sustainable future while providing safe, clean, and reliable water to its customers without interruption. Additionally, the City will continue to take proactive actions to prepare for even deeper shortages on the Colorado River as we strive to become the most sustainable desert city in the world.

Colorado River Water Shortage Caused by Climate Change will require Phoenix and Phoenicians to adapt

Phoenix to Host Water Conservation Media Day

Now that the City of Phoenix has activated its Drought Management Plan and declared a Stage 1 Water Alert, everyone in Phoenix should take action to conserve water. Conservation experts from the City of Phoenix will be available to discuss simple things people can do in their own homes to reduce water use. They will also demonstrate some of the latest technology for water conservation.

WHO: City of Phoenix water conservation experts

WHAT: Interviews and demonstrations about water conservation

WHEN: Monday, June 6 @ 9 a.m.

WHERE: 4106 W. La Mirada Drive, Phoenix, AZ

Please RSVP to Michael Gertzman at michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov

Media Contact:

Michael Gertzman

Water ServicesCell: 602-245-4143 (call or text) E-mail: michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov

Athena SanchezWater ServicesCell: 602-621-0507 (call or text) E-mail: athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov

Public art tells Arizona’s unique stories

PHOENIX (Arizona Highways TV) -- Pick a city or a town in Arizona and you’ll find incredible works of art without ever stepping foot in a gallery or museum. Creative displays of expression in bronze, metal, or paint dot our Arizona highways. Each piece is the artist’s response to a time or a place.“When I walk down the streets of Tubac, I remember the friendships built over the services I’ve provided, whether it’s a piece of true fine art or it’s functional signage or it’s a working gat...

PHOENIX (Arizona Highways TV) -- Pick a city or a town in Arizona and you’ll find incredible works of art without ever stepping foot in a gallery or museum. Creative displays of expression in bronze, metal, or paint dot our Arizona highways. Each piece is the artist’s response to a time or a place.

“When I walk down the streets of Tubac, I remember the friendships built over the services I’ve provided, whether it’s a piece of true fine art or it’s functional signage or it’s a working gate,” said David Voisard of Voisard Studios. “And that’s part of the fabric that I feel in Tubac, that my wife feels in Tubac, and it’s why we live here with our dogs.”

Like many towns along Old Route 66, Winslow, Arizona, nearly disappeared. Then, along came a little band called The Eagles, and “standin’ on the corner in Winslow, Arizona” became more pop culture than a pop culture reference. In fact, it became a kitschy thing to do.

Standin’ on the Corner Park is a tribute to the song “Take it Easy.” The two-story mural and bronze sculptures celebrate music and art while providing fans of the song and Route 66 a rocking place to connect, share, and create a few memories.

Here in Phoenix, it is hard to turn a corner and not find buildings and walls awash in vibrant color -- urban canvases that reflect the feelings, thoughts, and cultural heritage of the artists that painted them.

“Lots of people want their art hanging up in a gallery, but I would think having your art on a wall where everyone can see it as they drive by, because not a lot of people walk into galleries,” Robin Sewell said while chatting with artist Angel Diaz in front of one of his murals. “This has gotta be pretty big.”

He says his culture is his main inspiration. “If I’m going to do something out in the public, I tend to want to do my culture or our culture because it’s not about me at that point,” Diaz explained. “It’s about everybody.”

Phoenix is recognized as one of the top cities in the country for public art. The artistic spirit of the city is easy to access during Artlink’s First Fridays art walks. Many of the art spaces, galleries, collectives, and cultural performing arts venues have outdoor works on display for the public to enjoy both day and night.

Smaller cities and towns across Arizona are also using public art for placemaking and Main Street revitalization.

“For over 25 years, Main Street has been in the downtown in Casa Grande, creating an environment down here that’s welcoming and inviting to the people that come and visit,” said Rina Rien of Casa Grande Mainstreet.

“We want new businesses down here,” Kim McWherter of Downtown Live said. “We want an entertainment district, and we’re in the center of an amazing area.

“It was one of the first things we did down here to kind of get the art thing going,” Casa Grande artist Mark White said. “The Art in the Alley event that was held here in the past people learned to appreciate it. All this stuff that you see down here was primarily done by volunteers.

“The Casa Grande Art Museum is really unique in that it is a kind of intimate atmosphere,” Leah Kiser of the Casa Grande Art Association explained. “We wanted to get rid of the chain-link fence around the building and make it even more inviting.”

Some public works of art are so elaborate it can take years before it ever finds its public resting space. The bronze foundry in Prescott is responsible for many works of art on display in the Grand Canyon State.

“This is part of what we want to show at Bronzesmith,” Ed Reilly of Bronzesmith Fine Art Foundry and Gallery said. “We want to show how much work goes into it. One of the comments people make all the time is they had no idea that it was that complicated.”

“What’s really important -- and we talk about this all the time in the art business -- is site-specific work,” Reilly continued. “Where is this sculpture going to go? How is it gonna look like in that environment? There are pocket parks smaller sculptures would look great in, in a little courtyard setting. And then there are pieces that are monumental in size and it’s amazing how small this piece will look once it’s out in nature and without some space around it.”

Cultivating a unique community identity, celebrating our history, diversity, and heritage. Defining spaces to gather and ignite. Creating a dialog and challenging your senses and perception. This is what public art is all about.

And it’s there for you just off an Arizona highway.

Copyright 2022 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

First look: See what Taiwan Semiconductor is building at massive north Phoenix site

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., which is building a $12 billion plant in north Phoenix, released the first look of what their new facility will look like.TSMC released two renderings of the office building under construction on the site, a circular, glassy building.The project is under construction on 1,129 acres of...

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., which is building a $12 billion plant in north Phoenix, released the first look of what their new facility will look like.

TSMC released two renderings of the office building under construction on the site, a circular, glassy building.

The project is under construction on 1,129 acres of land near Interstate 17 and Loop 303 that TSMC purchased in December 2020. According to company representatives, the construction is on schedule to be operational in 2024. The project represents the largest foreign direct investment in Arizona’s history.

Structural construction of the fabrication facility, called the fab, is nearing completion, and the office building has about half of its glasswork completed. As of June, there are 38 cranes working on the massive site.

Hiring has also been underway, and the company has about 500 Arizona employees undergoing training in Taiwan, where TSMC is headquartered. The company expected to have more than 2,000 employees working at the Arizona plant by 2023.

Background:Auctioned north Phoenix land will become massive international semiconductor company factory

Spinoff development around the Valley

Arizona’s existing semiconductor industry is one of the reasons the chipmaker chose Phoenix for its facility, and the investment from TSMC has drawn suppliers and other semiconductor industry companies to Arizona since TSMC announced its plant.

Sunlit Chemical, a supplier of hydrofluoric acid, which is used in semiconductor production, is building the first phase of its north Phoenix plant in Deer Valley. That plant is scheduled to be operational by 2023, with another phase planned to be open in 2025.

Taiwan Puritic Corp., which provides raw materials to the semiconductor industry, has leased space in Phoenix and Glendale. Rinchem Co., a logistics provider for packaged chemicals and gases, is expanding to Surprise, after already having a presence in Chandler. Kokusai Semiconductor Equipment Corp., which provides processing systems for wafer manufacturing, has chosen a location in Glendale for spare parts distribution, training and office space, according to TSMC officials.

Texas school district targets Arizona teachers as state discusses budget

Arizona teachers are the targets of recruiting from Texas as state Legislators discuss Arizona's budget and education funding.PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) — As legislators discuss Arizona’s budget, educators are hoping for a bump in pay and investments. “So far, from what we’ve seen, is not a huge investment in school. There’s a huge investment in rainy day for what might happen,” said Marisol Garcia, the president-elect for the Arizona Education Association.Garcia said some money seems to be a...

Arizona teachers are the targets of recruiting from Texas as state Legislators discuss Arizona's budget and education funding.

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) — As legislators discuss Arizona’s budget, educators are hoping for a bump in pay and investments. “So far, from what we’ve seen, is not a huge investment in school. There’s a huge investment in rainy day for what might happen,” said Marisol Garcia, the president-elect for the Arizona Education Association.

Garcia said some money seems to be allocated into programs going into schools. “There’s some to the base--so some to help with a little bit of raise--and then there’s some investment into our actual structures that have been neglected for years and years,” said Garcia.

Garcia says the starting salary for new teachers is around $42,000. TAs a result, they’re finding it hard to compete with other states. “If I’m a family, a young family wanting to invest, figure out where we’re going to be. There’s a real close state across the way that’s willing to pay me more where I can buy a home and have a backyard and have a family,” Garcia said.

“I went to school in Illinois and my colleagues that I went to school with who are teaching in Illinois are making almost double what I make, so imagine what their starting salary is compared to what we’re seeing here,” said kindergarten teacher Kelley Fisher with 23 years of experience. “It’s no wonder that our college students who graduate with degrees in education immediately leave the state.”

Drivers around the Valley are seeing more billboards from the Dallas Independent School District, which is trying to recruit Arizona teachers. The billboard lists their salary range from $60,000 to $102,000. “We have competitive starting salaries of $60,000--not including our incentives that we have: $2,000 signing bonus, if you’re a math or science teacher, you’ll get a $3,000 incentive on top of that $2,000. If you’re bilingual, you’ll get another $5,00 incentive plus a $4,000 stipend,” said Steven Jackson, the director of recruitment at Dallas Independent School District. “We give a lot of financial things for teachers to be able to help them because we know the world we’re living in now and where the economy things are very high and expensive that we’re able to provide a competitive salary for our teachers to be able to have a living wage.”

Jackson says they’re targeting Arizona because they’ve noticed more teachers from the Phoenix area applying to Dallas ISD. “This is our first year we’re putting our efforts specifically on Arizona. When we look at our efforts, we look at historical data basically off of applications that we have as well as job fairs we attend and conferences as well,” Jackson explained. “We look at that data and we pinpoint, OK, we’re seeing that we have an influx of applicants from this area so we’ll go ahead and use of some of our recruitment efforts in those areas.”

Jackson said Dallas ISD will be holding a recruitment event in Phoenix on Friday and Saturday. More information can be found here.

“I guess I shouldn’t be surprised. If anyone who pays more than we do, especially at a starting teacher’s salary, should probably come here and advertise because regardless of all of the other things, it does come down to pay,” said Fisher. “We can complain about our workload issues, we can complain about our class sizes, but a lot of it comes down to--are we paid for our worth?”

Garcia hopes legislators see the need for a change and more focus on the education budget. “The fact that we have not made this a priority in this state and we’re not looking at it in the same way we should be looking at any other market. This is a professional market, people should be able to get paid what they deserve,” Garcia said. “Texas is not that much different than Arizona when it comes to housing prices so there is no reason, there’s no excuse for us to not be investing in schools in this state.”

The Arizona Department of Education said last school year, they had 1,700 teacher openings, about 25% of which are still unfilled. About 55% of the filled positions, however, are filled by teachers who do not meet the state’s standard certification requirements.

Copyright 2022 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

GM James Jones clarifies ESPN article on Phoenix Suns’ draft strategy

After the Phoenix Suns did not trade into a 2022 NBA Draft they had no selections in, general manager James Jones clarified an ESPN article that came out on Wednesday and painted a detailed picture of the team’s unorthodox draft practices.A quote from Suns senior analyst of personnel and team evaluation Zach Amundson said by the time the Suns’ scouting process is finishe...

After the Phoenix Suns did not trade into a 2022 NBA Draft they had no selections in, general manager James Jones clarified an ESPN article that came out on Wednesday and painted a detailed picture of the team’s unorthodox draft practices.

A quote from Suns senior analyst of personnel and team evaluation Zach Amundson said by the time the Suns’ scouting process is finished, their “draft board” only has five to seven players listed and the board “would be a mockery to other teams.”

The article, which featured quotes from many members of the front office including Jones, spotlighted Phoenix’s disinterest in young players who are drafted primarily because of their upside.

Phoenix’s draft board, later described as “sparse” and “tedious” in the piece by ESPN’s Kevin Arnovitz and said to be a practice the Suns have “sworn off,” is in fact not just a list with not even 10 prospects on it. Sure, it ends up with a group of preferred names at the top, but Jones on Thursday made it sound like it is not a process where they are crossing a bunch of names off like the article suggested.

“Nah, man, we have every player that’s in the draft processed on our board,” Jones said with a smile and laugh when asked if the board winds up with somewhere around 20 players or less on it. “When you get down to it, if you look at the combination of fit, skill set, talent, need — you typically get down somewhere about 10 guys who you know are really high-level fits. After that, you’re talking about degrees of fit and how much time, how much energy, how many opportunities guys will need to assimilate and kind of get acclimated to how you play.

“So you just prioritize and you put them in tiers. But I think when you go into tonight, you have all of those players but you truly know there are about eight to ten guys that you can say are truly Suns players that from day one will come in and not have very many issues getting accustomed to or getting integrated to what you do.”

The article cited that Amundson came to Jones in 2019 with 200-300 reports on NBA prospects that Jones said he wouldn’t be reading. Instead, Jones said he wanted to focus on “macro-level conversations about the kinds of prospects the Suns should be monitoring, or even a holistic discussion about a specific college player’s career.”

On Thursday, Jones said the Suns were “extremely aggressive” and “chased down every angle” while having more teams contact them than usual, since Phoenix didn’t have a pick and other teams wanted to see if one would interest them.

“There are a number of guys we targeted,” Jones said. “Just the deals that we had, they didn’t come together. But I thought that the draft had some quality depth at some of the positions. Ultimately we weren’t able to execute some of those trades and now we will look forward to free agency.”

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