Life Coach in Paradise Valley, AZ

Life Coach Paradise Valley, AZ
e-book
Christy

Feeling Disconnected?

Get Christy's book & learn how to become more connected to yourself, others and your life

I WANT THE BOOK

Break Out of Your Comfort Zone and Be Proud of Your True Self

The world is changing. People are finally learning how to manage their own human experiences. But we can't do it alone. Christy Maxey is here to guide you on the path to a positive, guilt-free life. If you're ready to look inward, find peace, and develop the skills to love your true self, you're in the right place. After all, you've been suffering long enough.

When you work with Christy, you'll be on a fast track to the truth - no beating around the bush or wasting time. Christy's methods are gentle but firm, compassionate yet driven. You will learn, you will transform, and you will be happy because it's you who did the work. It's time to face your fears head-on, so you can't play the victim card anymore. You're capable of great relationships, healthy self-confidence, and of doing something with your life. If you're sick and tired of being stuck, this is your chance to get out of that rut.

Ready to learn to value yourself and live the life that you deserve? Contact Christy Maxey today for your free 15-minute consultation.

Physical-therapy-phone-number Call Us480-600-3003

Free Consultation

Latest News in Paradise Valley, AZ

Your Random D-Back: Charles Brewer

Charles Brewer was born in Paradise Valley and went to one of the nation’s top ranked high schools: Scottsdale’s Chaparral High School. Looking at the surroundings where Brewer grew up, it is probably not that weird to think he was having a perfect boy’s life. According to an early prospect report he ...

Charles Brewer was born in Paradise Valley and went to one of the nation’s top ranked high schools: Scottsdale’s Chaparral High School. Looking at the surroundings where Brewer grew up, it is probably not that weird to think he was having a perfect boy’s life. According to an early prospect report he was a bright kid too and had a family mom that gave up an early career while being a very popular news anchor on KTSP (Channel 10), to devote herself to her family and kids.

“When I think of 25 years going by, I think in terms of sports years,” she says. “We started T-ball in that year and baseball in that year…it’s gone so fast it’s hard to believe.” - Deborah Brewer in a 2014 interview for Raising Arizona Kids on raising her children

It makes sense that in such an environment young Charles Brewer was able to prosper. And it sure doesn’t hurt when a family friend is Diamondback legend Randy Johnson.

“I got Randy Johnson who lives down the street. I play some long toss with him. Scott Schoeneweis, also another big leaguer, I play long toss with him, too. So it’s pretty cool to be around those guys.” - Charles Brewer in a 2007 interview for the Cape Cod Times

After going 33-0 during his four years at the Chaparral High School, the Angels drafted Brewer in the 18th round of the 2006 MLB Draft. The Arizona native couldn’t be persuaded to forego his commitment to UCLA and thus went to California anyhow, although wearing the white and blue of the bruins.

But his start as a freshman doesn’t go as planned.

“My first year was just a mess. I had a really great fall and a great winter and (then) me and my coach had a meeting and he told me I would be our Saturday starter. So I come back from winter break and I start feeling a little funny, and turns out I have mono. I was out two months, I came back a little too quickly, and I had rotator cuff and elbow tendinitis.” - Charles Brewer in a 2007 interview for the Cape Cod Times

Brewer makes it to the Cape Cod League though and shines for the Chatham A’s with a 1.94 ERA and limiting batters to a .210 average. That is an important accomplishment, like we discussed recently in a different article, and good for exposure.

Exposure is probably the reason what helps Charles Brewer on his way to the 2009 MLB draft. His results for the UCLA Bruins aren’t great with a 5.10 ERA in 2008 and 4.52 ERA in 2009. But in 2008 he gets the win in a nationally televised game against Arizona State and in 2009 he has Gerrit Cole and Trevor Bauer as team mates. Add to that a family friend in Randy Johnson and it might explain why Charles Brewer got enough exposure to be picked in the 2009 MLB draft by the Diamondbacks in the 12th round.

After being drafted as a junior in 2009 at the age of 21, the righty makes his way to Missoula to play rookie ball. The lower A and Rookie leagues are no challenge for Brewer who pitches to sub-3.00 ERAs up till AA in 2011, although his season in Mobile is interrupted by a broken hand. Despite that injury he is able to make it back in 2011 and pitches in the Fall league but is hit hard in 8 games. It would prove to be an early taste of what to get in AAA the following season.

In 2012 the pitcher gets his first taste of hard ball when he starts the season in Reno. He makes 24 starts for the Aces that season, but gets smacked around to an ugly 5.99 ERA. After a rather smooth transition from the PAC-10 to pro ball, once again Brewer is faced with something he isn’t really used to. The Diamondbacks sent him down to Mobile by the end of the season to tank a bit of confidence before getting a second chance in 2013 at AAA.

In 2013 hopes are high for Brewer after a successful Spring Training, but eventually it is much of the same as in 2012. He is able to drastically lower the fly balls though and thus to keep his ERA below 5.00. The Diamondbacks decide to reward the performance with a cup of coffee in the major leagues and as such Brewer becomes the first Arizona native to be drafted by the team and to make his major league debut with the Diamondbacks.

“Obviously, my whole life I’ve been dreaming of getting that opportunity to pitch on this field because I’ve always been a fan growing up,” rookie reliever Charles Brewer said. “I’ve been a fan since 1998 in the stands; same season tickets every year.” - Charles Brewer quoted by Arizona Sports in 2013

The hopes for him to stick are not very high on a prospect site like Minor League ball and on the AZSnakePit. Most writers have him as a possible back-end rotation starter, but in the MLB he gets a look as a reliever.

He gets his maiden voyage at Chavez Latrine where he gets to pitch 1.2 innings in a game the D-Backs are losing by 3-1. His work in the 7th inning is perfect, but in the 8th he loads the bases although escapes with a ground ball and a final out from Tony Sipp who comes on to relieve him. He enters his second game while the Diamondbacks are down 6-3 at the Padres and works two innings of relief, giving up two hits but no runs.

But the real highlight is yet to come. After the game against the Padres Brewer is optioned back to Reno, but returns to the majors in July to make his home debut at Chase Field in a win against the Colorado Rockies.

“Man, it was unbelievable,” Brewer said Sunday. “I had more energy and I was more locked in than I think I did in my previous first two outings. The excitement was even more so than even my debut. [...] It’s a lot different being at home,” the 25-year-old said. “The sound of the crowd after your name gets announced as opposed to being on the road. Last night when my name got announced, I think everyone knew that I was the hometown kid. The crowd kind of went nuts for me, so it was a really great feeling just having my hometown support behind me as I was going out there.” - Charles Brewer quoted by Arizona Sports in 2013

Two days later he is less lucky in yet another game against the Dodgers. He is tagged with two runs in the 7th inning, letting Los Angeles go further away with 5-0, and faces his final MLB batter in the 8th when Zack Greinke hits a single off him. He is then optioned back to Reno.

After those 4 games in 2013 you could wonder why the Diamondbacks didn’t give Brewer another chance on the 2014 team that would go 64-98. In Andrew Chafin and Bo Schultz there were two other pitchers on that 2014 Reno Aces team that didn’t do much better than Charles Brewer but got a call-up to the majors that year.

Never much of a prospect, the Diamondbacks probably just didn’t think he had the right stuff to succeed at major league level, and that might be true.

“He throws a four-seam and two-seam fastball, a curveball and a changeup, according to fangraphs, and his velocity is right in the 90 MPH range. Yeah, that scares me too.” - Cleveland Indians blog on Charles Brewer in 2014

However it might be, Brewer is designated for assignment in November 2014 and traded to the Cleveland Indians for cash considerations. He stays with that organisation until the end of May 2015 when he is released again. In 2016 he is back in Mobile, with the Diamondbacks, but is released after just a couple of weeks. A couple of short stints, probably forced because of a shoulder injury as hinted by the player in a video on YouTube about stem cell injection. In 2017 he pitches in the indepent leagues and soon afterwards retires from baseball, maybe because of a lack of perspective in baseball and probably because of other opportunities arising.

After ending his baseball career Charles Brewer is nowadays a real estate agent working in the surroundings of Dallas and as such has followed in his father’s footsteps. Maybe this will be the last time we will hear from Charles Brewer as it looks that for now he has stepped away from the spotlights. But good chance it isn’t the last time we will hear from the Brewer family ever since mother Deborah participated in Miss America 1979 on television.

Sister Ashley was a swimmer at the University of Texas and is nowadays a sport news anchor at ESPN. Brother Chase had an unsuccessful stint with the Diamondbacks in 2012 and now works as an agent for Excel Sports Management that also represents several MLB players. Brother Connor was once a 4-star QB and was committed to Division I Football (although that didn’t pan out). Sister Abby played volleyball at the University of Tennessee and is rumoured to have dated (and might still be dating) NBA’s Alex Caruso.

Yep, Arizona, Charles Brewer and the Brewer family definitely have lived and are living the perfect life.

More From AZ Snake Pit

Ask the candidate: Is a Paradise Valley population decrease of concern?

The Town of Paradise Valley lost about 200 residents in the past decade, the latest U.S. Census shows. Is that a problem?This week we ask the four Paradise Valley Town Council candidates about this slight decrease and the impact it may have on the municipality. Some point to the amount of state-shared revenues the town receives based on population growth, while others warn of the implications of having a town that sees less than 2% growth.While 200 people isn’t too big of a factor, it can have implications on an already s...

The Town of Paradise Valley lost about 200 residents in the past decade, the latest U.S. Census shows. Is that a problem?

This week we ask the four Paradise Valley Town Council candidates about this slight decrease and the impact it may have on the municipality. Some point to the amount of state-shared revenues the town receives based on population growth, while others warn of the implications of having a town that sees less than 2% growth.

While 200 people isn’t too big of a factor, it can have implications on an already small town like Paradise Valley.

Read below to learn the perspectives of each candidate as they prepare for the Aug. 2 primary election, where voters will select three people to fill the open Town Council seats.

• The 2020 U.S. Census shows Paradise Valley population has decreased slightly — the census shows the town lost about 200 residents over 10 years. Is this something to be concerned about?

While we show a slight decrease in our population of less than 2%, our data shows that the number of short-term rentals and homes purchased by corporations for that purpose have been the primary driver for the population decrease. The census was also conducted during COVID in April of 2020, and, with the seasonality of our residents, some may have not returned to Paradise Valley that year to been counted.

The town has six different sources of revenue that make up the general fund with intergovernmental comprising 10% of the total. As of February, fiscal year to date 2021-2022 there will be a slight decrease in state-shared revenue of 3% or $110,000. However, in budgeting for 2023 we are forecasting an increase. I’m not too concerned about our revenue decline in this bucket, as we have many more sources of revenue that are showing significant increases.

Our town is well capitalized with $70 million in cash reserves. I have sat on an investment sub-committee, when organized, with two other council members and the CFO. However, I’ve advocated for an investment committee during my tenure on council that is comprised of our resident experts. The town does not levy a property tax to our residents, and I continue to support that.

The more concerning part of this equation is the influx of corporate buyers to our overall mix in population and the changing of our neighborhoods. Along with, if our population continues to reduce and were to drop below 10,000 or not exceed a 2% growth rate, according to ARS Section 9-461.06, the general plan will not need voter ratification and would be adopted by the town council.

It is important our residents are informed and have input to our town’s general plan — being that is what will guide the town for the next 10 years. Something to be mindful about. The Census 2020 showed our population at 12,658.

• The 2020 U.S. Census shows Paradise Valley population has decreased slightly — the census shows the town lost about 200 residents over 10 years. Is this something to be concerned about?

With state and federal dollars riding on population, it is unfortunate that the town has lost residents in the census. This number will impact our revenue.

This said, we have built so many more residences over the last decade, and we have attracted more people who are living here, just not as their primary domicile, which is what counts in the census numbers.

If you take a look at our revenues, especially during the pandemic, our sales tax collection as a result of home deliveries has exploded. During my tenure on council, we have created a strong financial foundation for the town, and still managed to prevent implementation of a local property tax. We will be fine financially, and we can continue to enjoy the small town feeling Paradise Valley has, even though we’re sandwiched between Phoenix and Scottsdale.

• The 2020 U.S. Census shows Paradise Valley population has decreased slightly — the census shows the town lost about 200 residents over 10 years. Is this something to be concerned about?

It’s true that the population of Paradise Valley has lost approximately 200 residents. There are some cautionary consequences for Paradise Valley if this trend continues.

Take Sedona for example, a city that gained notoriety for its beautiful landscape, much as Paradise Valley is getting now. According to Sedona’s city attorney Kurt Christianson, “There is no authority in ARS Section §9-461.06 for voter ratification [of their general plan] because Sedona’s population is under 10,000 and has been growing at less than 2% per year.” Sedona’s population decline came largely due to non-primary and vacation rentals pushing out full time residents.

As seen throughout the years, many Paradise Valley residents tend to remain in their homes well past retirement and into their final days. As kids continue to grow and move away from Paradise Valley, our population naturally declines. And our quality of life and sentiment to our town parallels a love of our properties that’s not easily left behind. But there is hope.

Through my experience as a Paradise Valley Realtor, I feel there is a positive trend toward younger families moving in with school age children.

Buyers from all walks of life and around the world are eying Paradise Valley as a great place to raise a family. As a Paradise Valley resident and mother of twin daughters, I believe our town will be positively served by supporting this narrative and paying attention to what brings families here for generations:

Declining populations can be a blessing and a curse. Low density and open space in a major metropolitan area like Phoenix or Scottsdale is rare indeed. But we always want and need to embrace the next generation who will inherit our love and understanding of our town and its history. It is our responsibility to create that for present and future Paradise Valley residents.

As your town council member, I will work tirelessly to maintain our high quality of life by ensuring town hall is listening to and engaging with our community. I humbly ask for your vote to elect me to the Paradise Valley Town Council and to learn more about me visit LabelleforPVCouncil.com.

• The 2020 U.S. Census shows Paradise Valley population has decreased slightly — the census shows the town lost about 200 residents over 10 years. Is this something to be concerned about?

We are already special; we don’t need to be big. As a small, 14 square mile, land-locked community with strict zoning ordinances in an increasingly expensive real estate market, I am not surprised nor concerned by our lack of population growth. Most population growth in Maricopa County came from our outlying, affordable cities Queen Creek, Goodyear, Gilbert, Peoria, Litchfield Park and Surprise.

Although we will lose income as we receive a smaller percentage of the population-based, state shared revenue, we will still be very well funded by sales tax revenue from our world-class resorts. And we operate very frugally as a town. Making sure we work hard to stop the threats from short term rentals and other non-residential home uses that could further erode our population will remain a priority for me.

Our founders wanted to create a special place, very different from neighboring Phoenix and Scottsdale. We have done a great job so far and I’m confident we will continue to do so.

Melissa Rosequist

Lead News Editor | Scottsdale & Town of Paradise Valley | mrosequist@iniusa.org

I first started my journalism portfolio at the age of 15 while in high school before going on to study at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Being in the journalism field is the only professional avenue I was ever interested in, and have worked hard covering topics from school boards to hard news while working for the Independent, where I have been awarded for my reporting.

By Melissa RosequistMail | Twitter: @mrosequist_

What are they building? Check out developer's plans for new Paradise Valley mall site

One of the Valley’s most popular shopping destinations is slated to get a fresh new look that will incorporate retail, entertainment and luxury housing.PHOENIX — Editor's Note: The above video is from an earlier broadcast.One of the Valley’s most popular shopping destinations is slated to get a fresh new look that will incorporate retail, entertainment, and luxury housing.RED Development, a Phoenix-based real estate company, announced on Tuesday new details about ...

One of the Valley’s most popular shopping destinations is slated to get a fresh new look that will incorporate retail, entertainment and luxury housing.

PHOENIX — Editor's Note: The above video is from an earlier broadcast.

One of the Valley’s most popular shopping destinations is slated to get a fresh new look that will incorporate retail, entertainment, and luxury housing.

RED Development, a Phoenix-based real estate company, announced on Tuesday new details about Paradise Valley Mall’s redevelopment project, including the project’s new name and logo.

The massive update is currently underway at the 100+ acre site at Tatum Boulevard and Cactus Road in Phoenix.

The company said the project will be named “PV." The site will have a new logo that was inspired by the Union Jack entry cubes, an original architectural element of Paradise Valley Mall from the 1970s.

Phase one of PV will open in mid-2024 and include a 400-resident apartment building, a Whole Foods Market, a new Harkins dine-in luxury theater concept, and three upscale restaurants that the company said will be announced soon.

Phase one will also include an expansive 3+ acre central park with walking paths. The park will have also have a pavilion for performances, events, and community activities.

“This is the first of many exciting announcements planned and we look forward to seeing these phase one tenants embark on construction,” said Phoenix City Councilwoman Deb Stark.

The company said the next phases of the property will include office, additional retail and residential, hospitality, and entertainment concepts.

For more information about PV, visit pvPHX.com.

Catch up on the latest news and stories on the 12 News YouTube channel. Subscribe today.

Fitch Rates Paradise Valley USD No. 69, AZ $76.4MM ULTs 'AAA', Affirms IDR at 'AA'; Outlook Stable

Fitch Ratings - Austin - 16 Feb 2022: Fitch Ratings has assigned a 'AAA' rating to the following Paradise Valley Unified School District No. 69 of Maricopa County, AZ (Paradise Valley USD, or the district) bonds:--$43,200,000 school improvement bonds, project of 2019, series C (2022);--$33,200,000 refunding bonds, series 2022.In addition, Fitch has affirmed the following Paradise Valley USD ratings:--Long-Term Issuer Default Rating (IDR) at 'AA'.--More than $350 million outstanding unlimited tax (ULT) schoo...

Fitch Ratings - Austin - 16 Feb 2022: Fitch Ratings has assigned a 'AAA' rating to the following Paradise Valley Unified School District No. 69 of Maricopa County, AZ (Paradise Valley USD, or the district) bonds:

--$43,200,000 school improvement bonds, project of 2019, series C (2022);

--$33,200,000 refunding bonds, series 2022.

In addition, Fitch has affirmed the following Paradise Valley USD ratings:

--Long-Term Issuer Default Rating (IDR) at 'AA'.

--More than $350 million outstanding unlimited tax (ULT) school improvement bonds at 'AAA'.

The Rating Outlook is Stable.

The bonds are scheduled to be sold via negotiation as early as the week of Feb. 21. Series C proceeds will be used to finance facility improvements, transportation vehicles, technology equipment and pay the costs of issuance. The series 2022 proceeds will refund a portion of the district's outstanding series 2012A ULT debt for interest savings.

Both series of bonds and outstanding ULT bonds are payable from an unlimited ad valorem tax levied against all taxable property in the district.

The 'AA' IDR and 'AAA' ULT bond rating reflect the district's sound fiscal performance and conservative budget practices, which have maintained a solid degree of financial flexibility despite a relatively unremarkable revenue history, compared with GDP and inflation. The ratings also incorporate the district's low liability burden, which Fitch expects will remain manageable based on planned capital borrowing and above-average debt amortization. Also considered in the rating is the district's superior operating performance, as demonstrated through sound expense control and the establishment of sizable reserves.

The Arizona Legislature in its 2016 and 2017 sessions (52nd and 53rd Legislatures) approved amendments to various sections of the Arizona Revised Statutes that provide ULT bondholders with a statutory lien on ad valorem taxes of cities, towns, counties, school districts, community college districts and various special districts in the state. Fitch believes the statute provides bondholders with a substantial preferential right in a bankruptcy proceeding, warranting a ULT bond rating two notches higher than the entity's IDR. The statutory lien applies only to ad valorem tax revenues and applies both to ULT bonds previously issued and to be issued in the future. The legislation did not affect Fitch's IDR of the district.

This relatively mature district is located in the northeastern Phoenix MSA, serving portions of Phoenix and Scottsdale (IDR AAA/Stable). Despite pre-pandemic modest declines, with a student body of more than 27,000 in fiscal 2022, as measured by average daily membership or ADM, this district remains one of the largest in the state. Similar to many districts across the country, Paradise Valley USD 69 has experienced pandemic-driven enrollment losses. From fiscals 2020 to 2021 ADM declined by about 6%, followed by another 2% drop from fiscals 2021 to 2022. Enrollment losses prior to the pandemic are largely attributable to shifting demographics and charter school competition. Approximately one-third of the district is state-owned land that is planned for residential use once sold by the state. Although the state has sold some portions and there is incremental development ongoing, a substantial portion remains undeveloped.

Revenue Framework: 'bbb'

Fitch expects slow revenue growth at or below the rate of inflation with increases to K-12 per-pupil state funding levels partially offset by gradual enrollment declines. Arizona school districts lack the ability to independently raise operating revenues.

Expenditure Framework: 'aa'

District expenditures are anticipated to grow in line with or marginally above its revenues. Expenditure flexibility is solid, reflecting moderate fixed carrying costs and strong management control over workforce spending.

Long-Term Liability Burden: 'aaa'

The long-term liability burden for overall debt and pensions is low at an estimated 6% of 2020 resident personal income. Despite additional borrowing plans for the district and the capital needs of other local governments, Fitch does not expect the debt load to significantly outpace personal income growth.

Operating Performance: 'aaa'

The district's gap-closing capacity is superior, supported by its solid budget execution and financial flexibility and a sizable fiscal cushion in the form of unrestricted general fund balance.

Factors that could, individually or collectively, lead to positive rating action/upgrade:

--Faster than predicted enrollment growth, leading to additional state funding and an increase in the revenue growth prospects assessment.

Factors that could, individually or collectively, lead to negative rating action/downgrade:

--Sustained deterioration of the district's enrollment trends leading to weaker revenue growth prospects;

--A sustained increase in fixed cost spending materially above 20% of governmental outlays, leading to what Fitch believes is a weakening of the district's expenditure flexibility;

--Sustained structural imbalances and diminished financial reserves below the 'aaa' financial resiliency assessment threshold.

International scale credit ratings of Sovereigns, Public Finance and Infrastructure issuers have a best-case rating upgrade scenario (defined as the 99th percentile of rating transitions, measured in a positive direction) of three notches over a three-year rating horizon; and a worst-case rating downgrade scenario (defined as the 99th percentile of rating transitions, measured in a negative direction) of three notches over three years. The complete span of best- and worst-case scenario credit ratings for all rating categories ranges from 'AAA' to 'D'. Best- and worst-case scenario credit ratings are based on historical performance. For more information about the methodology used to determine sector-specific best- and worst-case scenario credit ratings, visit https://www.fitchratings.com/site/re/10111579.

Since fiscal 2016, the district has made continual strides toward increasing its reserve position. Fiscal 2021 audited results reflect a net operating surplus of $10.5 million, boosting the district's available reserve balance to $81.6 million or a very strong 38% of operating expenditures. Federal stimulus dollars received by the district offset portions of one-time costs that would usually be absorbed by the general operating fund and/or made up for some of the loss in enrollment-related revenue.

In general, Fitch does not expect the district's reserve cushion will remain as high in future years, particularly with the planned use of available one-time federal stimulus dollars, inflationary pressures, and some uncertainty in post-pandemic enrollment performance. However, Fitch anticipates reserves will remain comfortably above the 'aaa' resilience threshold.

For fiscal 2022, the district's approximately $287 million adopted M&O budget represents a 9% increase over the prior year. According to district representatives, despite a 600-student loss in ADM since the prior year (due to the pandemic), the budget is largely trending well. By fiscal year-end, management expects favorable budget results of at least a 4% carryforward, or surplus. Although some uncertainty exists as ADM continues to fluctuate (due to the ongoing pandemic), Fitch believes management's expectations for surplus operations at the close of the current fiscal year are feasible.

Like many school districts, the district is eligible for ARPA funds, codified as ESSER I, ESSER II and ESSER III funds. Per management, the ESSER I and II funds, of about $23 million (combined) were used to finance one-time pay increases and technology needs. The district's ESSER III allocation totals $41.5 million, which must be used over a three-year time period. Management expects to use ESSER III monies to finance nonrecurring needs, including but not limited to learning loss/intervention programs.

Following the series C issuance, the district will have roughly $90 million in authorized, but unissued debt remaining. Officials expect to issue the remaining authorization in several tranches over the next few years.

The district benefits from its inclusion in the diverse and expanding Phoenix MSA economy. Residents access to a strong employment base support its well-above average wealth and income indicators. Median household and per capita income levels exceed county, state and national averages.

While a good portion the district is built-out, there continues to be sizable residential and commercial development in the northern portion of the district, and to a lesser degree in the southern portion of the district. According to district officials, most of the future growth will take place in the north as there is a great deal of developable land. Estimated full cash (market) value for the current fiscal year is $43 billion, which is a 26% increase over fiscal 2019 market value. Management attributes this growth to continual gains in commercial and retail development. As growth in these sectors continues, district representatives expect enrollment to experience an uptick.

In addition to the sources of information identified in Fitch's applicable criteria specified below, this action was informed by information from Lumesis.

The principal sources of information used in the analysis are described in the Applicable Criteria.

Unless otherwise disclosed in this section, the highest level of ESG credit relevance is a score of '3'. This means ESG issues are credit-neutral or have only a minimal credit impact on the entity, either due to their nature or the way in which they are being managed by the entity. For more information on Fitch's ESG Relevance Scores, visit www.fitchratings.com/esg.

The rated entity (and/or its agents) or, in the case of structured finance, one or more of the transaction parties participated in the rating process except that the following issuer(s), if any, did not participate in the rating process, or provide additional information, beyond the issuer’s available public disclosure.

Numbers in parentheses accompanying applicable model(s) contain hyperlinks to criteria providing description of model(s).

Copyright © 2022 by Fitch Ratings, Inc., Fitch Ratings Ltd. and its subsidiaries. 33 Whitehall Street, NY, NY 10004. Telephone: 1-800-753-4824, (212) 908-0500. Fax: (212) 480-4435. Reproduction or retransmission in whole or in part is prohibited except by permission. All rights reserved. In issuing and maintaining its ratings and in making other report

The ratings above were solicited and assigned or maintained by Fitch at the request of the rated entity/issuer or a related third party. Any exceptions follow below.

Fitch’s international credit ratings produced outside the EU or the UK, as the case may be, are endorsed for use by regulated entities within the EU or the UK, respectively, for regulatory purposes, pursuant to the terms of the EU CRA Regulation or the UK Credit Rating Agencies (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, as the case may be. Fitch’s approach to endorsement in the EU and the UK can be found on Fitch’s Regulatory Affairs page on Fitch’s website. The endorsement status of international credit ratings is provided within the entity summary page for each rated entity and in the transaction detail pages for structured finance transactions on the Fitch website. These disclosures are updated on a daily basis.

Arizona Home Sells for $13.7 Million After Price Increase

After a price increase, a home in Paradise Valley, Ariz., has sold for $13.7 million in one of the state’s most expensive recorded home sales this year.Jill Brenenstuhl of Walt Danley Christie’s International Real Estate, who represented the buyer and seller, said she first listed the home for $10.9 million in October 2021. Then,...

After a price increase, a home in Paradise Valley, Ariz., has sold for $13.7 million in one of the state’s most expensive recorded home sales this year.

Jill Brenenstuhl of Walt Danley Christie’s International Real Estate, who represented the buyer and seller, said she first listed the home for $10.9 million in October 2021. Then, with home values in the area on the rise, she increased the price last month to $13.7 million.

Along with a roughly 15,500-square-foot main home, the property also comes with a two-bedroom guesthouse. Photos: Jessica Wells/Well Styled Images(4)

The buyer was sprinter-turned-real-estate investor Eliot Tabron; Ms. Brenenstuhl declined to disclose the seller. Another offer came from a developer who wanted to split the property into two, but Ms. Brenenstuhl said the seller chose Mr. Tabron because he plans to live in the home.

The property spans about 3.3 acres with a roughly 15,500-square-foot, 9-bedroom main house and a guesthouse, she said. The main house has an indoor basketball court, movie theater and wine room.

Mr. Tabron, 61, is a Detroit native who represented the United States as a sprinter in the early 1980s, he said. In 1984, he qualified for the Olympic trials, but was unable to compete due to a hamstring injury. He became a stockbroker, then a real-estate investor and broker.

Mr. Tabron said he moved from Bloomfield Hills, Mich., to Arizona in the early 2010s to be closer to his wife’s family. Before buying this Paradise Valley home—which he said is about 3 miles from his brother’s house—his primary residence was in nearby North Scottsdale.

“When I saw this house, for some reason, it reminded me of my house in Bloomfield Hills,” he said. “It had everything I’ve dreamed of, including the land.”

Mr. Tabron said he plans to remodel the theater so that he can use it for Zoom calls, and is debating turning the roughly 2,000-square-foot guesthouse into a home office. The grounds also include a tennis court, swimming pool, vegetable garden and citrus orchard.

Since the onset of the pandemic, out-of-state buyers have flocked to Paradise Valley in search of warmer weather, lower taxes, and spacious properties, causing home values to spike.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

Would an indoor basketball court make you more or less likely to purchase a home? Why?

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
>
Call Now Button

Service Areas