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Latest News in Mesa, AZ

Mesa fire experts explain how to prevent causing a fire ahead of extreme heat

We haven’t had rain in months, so the dozens of wildfires we’ve seen this year could be just a preview of what’s to come.MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) - Extreme heat means everything is about to get a lot drier. We haven’t had rain in months, so the dozens of wildfires we’ve seen this year could be just a preview of what’s to come.It’s why Arizona’s fire prevention education is telling the public about wildfire response and preparedness. “We call these one-hour fuels. One litt...

We haven’t had rain in months, so the dozens of wildfires we’ve seen this year could be just a preview of what’s to come.

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) - Extreme heat means everything is about to get a lot drier. We haven’t had rain in months, so the dozens of wildfires we’ve seen this year could be just a preview of what’s to come.

It’s why Arizona’s fire prevention education is telling the public about wildfire response and preparedness. “We call these one-hour fuels. One little spark on this and it can take off,” said Brad Bramlett, a member of the National Fire Prevention Team.

Dry grass, or what experts call fuel, can be found along highways all over the state. “In just a matter of minutes, especially in high winds, this could just take off,” said Bramlett.

Those extreme fire conditions are already straining resources. Bramlett said more than half of the fires in Arizona are human-caused. That’s why his agency is partnering with the U.S. Forest Service to educate people. “If you’re going down the road and your chain is dragging the ground, that spark gets over on a windy day and a blows a spark up over into the grass, it can ignite a fire,” he said.

If people do start fires that quickly spread, the Mesa Gateway Air Tanker Base has a dispatch center that will send help. “Putting this base here, it’s a centrally located base in Arizona that allows us to have a good pivot point of the whole Southwest to be able to respond to these fires,” said Chris Price, the Base Manager. He said every year, the fire season grows longer. Although we’re off to a slow fire season, they expect it to pick up during monsoon season because of lightning.

Saturday marks National Get Outdoors Day. As you plan your weekend activities, check the fire restrictions in place for each public lands agency on their website or Facebook page, and educate yourself on how to safely recreate outdoors during fire season. Here are some tips:

Copyright 2022 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

When will Arizona run out of water? Why that's the wrong question to ask

Opinion: People want to know when water shortages will change life as we know it in Arizona. But the answer can vary widely, depending on where you are.When will Arizona (or Phoenix, or insert your place of residence here) run out of water?That’s a common...

Opinion: People want to know when water shortages will change life as we know it in Arizona. But the answer can vary widely, depending on where you are.

When will Arizona (or Phoenix, or insert your place of residence here) run out of water?

That’s a common Google search.

But the question is misguided, because it presumes that 1) we could answer with certainty and 2) there would be a hard water cutoff and life as we know it ends.

The reality is far more complicated.

Why is there no simple answer for when the water runs out?

In some rural Arizona communities, the water already has run out – in that people’s wells have gone dry. They rely on friends with water to fill gallon jugs, which they cart back to their homes to wash dishes and themselves.

Yet life goes on, albeit precariously, and we seem fine with that. If we weren’t, we would have put consumer protections in place years ago so that others couldn’t sink a deeper well next door and suck them dry.

Even in metro Phoenix, there is no across-the-board answer because of how much our water supplies vary. Some areas have access to multiple renewable supplies and don’t fully utilize them. Others rely mostly on finite groundwater, or in some cases hauled water from elsewhere, with no backups.

That’s why some folks in the unincorporated Rio Verde Foothills could lose their sole source of water in December, while their Scottsdale neighbors may never face the prospect of a dry tap.

When will Lake Mead shortages hit Arizona's largest cities?

Sustained shortages on Lake Mead are going to change life as we know it. We know that much.

It’s likely we will land in a Tier 2 shortage next year, which will mostly erase Central Arizona Project’s Non-Indian Agricultural (NIA) pool. For cities like Buckeye and Queen Creek, that represents nearly all the Colorado River water to which they are entitled.

But not for cities like Phoenix, Scottsdale or Mesa. They also have larger shares of higher-priority Municipal & Industrial (M&I) pool water that won’t be impacted until a deeper Tier 3 shortage is declared.

The state’s internal Drought Contingency Plan also mitigates the impacts of losing NIA water, meaning contractors are in line to receive water from other sources. It won’t completely replace what they’re losing, and the amounts vary depending on which part of a Tier 2 shortage we fall in and what year it is.

The state plan doesn’t include any mitigation for a Tier 3 shortage, but even then, that doesn’t necessarily mean residents will be directly impacted – at least, not immediately.

Many cities will begin tapping into their savings accounts, including the Colorado River water they’ve been storing underground for years.

But withdrawing this water – particularly from the state’s water bank – is very much uncharted territory. And state water officials are already warning that even deeper cuts than a Tier 3 shortage may soon be on the way, given how quickly Lake Mead is draining.

Both of which make it difficult to predict how life might change for existing and future residents – and as importantly, when.

If you can't tell me when this will hurt, why should I conserve now?

It’s sort of like that adage: You can pay me now, on your own terms, or you can pay later, with interest.

Because even if taps don’t run dry, state law requires cities to spell out how they would trim use as shortages grow. Most involve some form of mandated conservation, mostly outdoors.

That makes sense because that’s where most of our water goes, and unlike what we use indoors, outdoor water typically does not make its way into sewers and eventually to a treatment plant for reuse.

Scottsdale asked residents to voluntarily trim 5% of their use this year and in the first quarter saved about 327 acre-feet, or more than 106 million gallons.

Other cities should follow suit, and couple those asks with generous and easy-to-use turf removal rebates, perhaps funded with leftover pandemic relief funds.

But residents also should know that cities won’t be asking forever, particularly as they receive less water from Lake Mead. Mandates are coming – as are higher water bills.

The question shouldn’t be “when will Arizona run out of water,” but rather, “if we must learn to live on less, how can I do my part?”

Reach Allhands at joanna.allhands@arizonarepublic.com. On Twitter: @joannaallhands.

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A unique show takes the stage in Mesa after two-year hiatus

The city’s “Adaptive Theater” program features young actors and actresses with various intellectual disabilities.MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) - A unique stage tradition returned to Mesa after a two-year hiatus during the pandemic. The city’s “Adaptive Theater” program features young actors and actresses with various intellectual disabilities.Their 2022 production of “The Lion King” was a welcome return to the stage for the cast and their proud parents. “It’s overwhelmin...

The city’s “Adaptive Theater” program features young actors and actresses with various intellectual disabilities.

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) - A unique stage tradition returned to Mesa after a two-year hiatus during the pandemic. The city’s “Adaptive Theater” program features young actors and actresses with various intellectual disabilities.

Their 2022 production of “The Lion King” was a welcome return to the stage for the cast and their proud parents. “It’s overwhelming to me,” said Jackie Mandujano, whose son, Andrew, played a hyena. Her daughter, Allyson, was a lioness. “This is what I laid in bed many years ago dreaming about, and wishing they could be part of something like this,” she said.

Director Matt Erickson says he isn’t aware of a similar program of this size anywhere in the country. “It’s so sad to say, but a lot of these kids in high school never got the chance to be in a show. This is their chance,” he said.

They built momentum through a series of shows at Red Mountain High School, but the shows, along with most activities, halted in 2020. “I’m just so excited that we’re back,” said Noah Christensen, who played Simba in the show.

“I was bored at home without things like this,” echoed Bella Walpole, who played Timon.

The cast took on the challenges of learning the lines, songs, and dances with the help of a team of volunteers who work with Mesa’s adaptive programs. “I’m totally different from [the villain lion] Scar, but I learned to act and sound just like him,” said Jaden Cordova.

Parents, who helped build the sets and create the 300 costumes needed to bring “The Lion King” to life, can’t stop gushing about the performance, the show’s director, and the volunteers who made it happen. “They’re all here for one purpose. They’re all here to make each person on stage shine for three nights. It’s truly remarkable,” she said.

Equally thankful was Bill Davis, whose daughter Andrea missed performing and socializing during the pandemic break. “It helps her socialization skills, her speech, and helps her experience life and come out of her shell,” he said.

“Last night they said they’re so proud and happy. You can’t get a better feeling than that as a parent,” Mandujano said, adding her teens are already looking forward to next year’s show.

The theater program is one of many activities available to Mesa teens and adults with developmental disabilities. The cast members also participate in everything from cooking classes to sports throughout the year.

Copyright 2022 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Looking for something to do this 4th of July? Here are some fun events happening around the Valley

Celebrate Independence Day at some of the most fun and diverse events happening around the Valley. Enjoy fireworks, food, live music and fun for all of the family.PHOENIX — From spectacular fireworks shows to fun-around-the-sun events, the Valley has you covered for all your Fourth of July festivities.Here's a breakdown of all the events happening in the Phoenix metro area in honor of Independence Day.Red, White and COOL Scottsdale 4th of JulyThis annual event is coming back for its ninth ye...

Celebrate Independence Day at some of the most fun and diverse events happening around the Valley. Enjoy fireworks, food, live music and fun for all of the family.

PHOENIX — From spectacular fireworks shows to fun-around-the-sun events, the Valley has you covered for all your Fourth of July festivities.

Here's a breakdown of all the events happening in the Phoenix metro area in honor of Independence Day.

Red, White and COOL Scottsdale 4th of July

This annual event is coming back for its ninth year. You can enjoy indoor fun such as bull riding and live music or only attend the fireworks show. There is food to be devoured and family time to be savored. The fireworks show will begin approximately at 9 p.m.

First at the Fountain

This annual event is happening a little bit earlier this year due to a fireworks shortage. Head to Fountain Hills on July 1 to celebrate Independence Day with live music and a fireworks show. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own chairs and blankets.

Red, White & Choo & Choo

All aboard for McCormick-Stillman Railroad Park's Independence Day celebration. Head to the park to enjoy a night of fun, food, live music and unlimited train and carousel rides. There is also a pitmaster competition for those interested in cooking some barbecue.

Arizona Celebration of Freedom

Downtown Mesa is gearing up for a night of entertainment and events to help you celebrate Independence Day. This celebration includes everything from live music and a stunt show, to a Naturalization ceremony welcoming 75 new American Citizens.

Royal Palm Neighborhood Annual Fourth of July Celebration

Are you more of a morning person and want to celebrate Independence Day when temperatures are cooler? The Royal Palm Fourth of July Celebration is the perfect way to kick-off your Fourth of July morning with family and friends. You can check out lots of different vendors and stick around for the bike parade.

Fusion Festival

The Fourth of July Fusion Festival will be jam-packed with food and fun for everyone to enjoy.

EVIT at City of Mesa's Freedom Tie Dye

This event is the perfect way to cool off in the pool while having fun with the family. Grab a white shirt and head down to the aquatic center for loads of fun.

Four on the 4th run to the top

Kick off your Independence Day with an early morning run. This inaugural event is both fun and challenging. If you love running and the outdoors, then this event is made for you.

Catch up on the latest news and stories on the 12 News YouTube channel. Subscribe today.

Maricopa County confirms 1st probable case of monkeypox in Arizona

PHOENIX - Arizona health officials on June 7 confirmed the first probable case of monkeypox in the state. The Maricopa County Department of Public Health and the Arizona Department of Health Services say laboratory testing returned a presumptive positive result. Confirmatory testing is now underway at the CDC....

PHOENIX - Arizona health officials on June 7 confirmed the first probable case of monkeypox in the state. The Maricopa County Department of Public Health and the Arizona Department of Health Services say laboratory testing returned a presumptive positive result. Confirmatory testing is now underway at the CDC.

The patient has been identified as a man in his 30s who is in isolation and recovering. MCDPH and ADHS did not release a location for where in Maricopa County the probable case was reported.

MCDPH officials stated, "Monkeypox is a viral illness that primarily spreads through skin-to-skin contact, although it can also spread through respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact. It is endemic in some countries but not the United States, though several countries, including the United States, have seen cases in recent weeks."

MORE: Monkeypox: What you should know as the disease spreads around the world

Monkeypox? What is it?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, monkeypox is caused by a virus that is in the same genus of viruses that causes smallpox.

Monkeypox, according to the CDC, was first discovered in 1958, following two outbreaks of a pox-like disease in colonies of monkeys that were kept for research.

The first human case of the disease was recorded in a country now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1970, during a period of intensified effort to eliminate smallpox. Since then, the disease has been reported in people in several central and western African countries. Cases have also been reported in the U.S., as well as a number of Asian, Middle Eastern, and European countries.

What are the symptoms of monkeypox?

According to CDC's website, it takes usually seven to 14 days from the time of infection for a person to start feeling symptoms of the disease, but the incubation period can also range from five to 21 days. Officials say the illness begins with a fever, followed by:

One to three days after the fever starts, a rash will begin, often on the face before spreading to other parts of the body.

MCPH says the rash may begin as small, flat, round discolorations that become raised and fluid-filled (clear or pus) before scabbing. These spots and the fluid in them carry the virus that can infect others. Once scabs fall off, the area is no longer infectious. These spots or lesions can appear anywhere on the skin, genitals, or inside the mouth. Most patients with Monkeypox fully recover from the virus without treatment.

"Monkeypox can spread through contact with lesions, scabs, and bodily fluids, so we encourage anyone who develops fever or swollen lymph nodes with a rash to consult a healthcare provider for testing," said Dr. Rebecca Sunenshine, medical director for disease control at MCDPH.

"ADHS is working closely with local health departments throughout Arizona to identify and respond quickly to any potential cases," added Don Herrington, ADHS interim director. "It’s important to note that monkeypox is highly controllable through simple precautions."

Treatment

The CDC says there is no specific treatment approved for monkeypox virus infections, but antivirals developed for use in patients with smallpox may prove beneficial.

Tecovirimat (also known as TPOXX) is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adults and pediatric patients. It's available as an oral 200 mg capsule and intravenous formulations.

Cidofovir (also known as Vistide) is approved by the FDA for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

People who should be considered for treatment might include:

If a person has been exposed to monkeypox and is asymptomatic, they may be eligible for post-exposure vaccination.

Prevention

Officials say the best way to prevent the spread of monkeypox and other viruses is to wash your hands after you touch someone, wear a mask in a crowded indoor space, stay home if you're sick with fever or respiratory symptoms and to avoid touching a rash or skin lesions on someone else.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
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