Life Coach in Maricopa, AZ

Life Coach Maricopa, AZ
e-book
Christy

Feeling Disconnected?

Get Christy's book & learn how to become more connected to yourself, others and your life

I WANT THE BOOK

Break Out of Your Comfort Zone and Be Proud of Your True Self

The world is changing. People are finally learning how to manage their own human experiences. But we can't do it alone. Christy Maxey is here to guide you on the path to a positive, guilt-free life. If you're ready to look inward, find peace, and develop the skills to love your true self, you're in the right place. After all, you've been suffering long enough.

When you work with Christy, you'll be on a fast track to the truth - no beating around the bush or wasting time. Christy's methods are gentle but firm, compassionate yet driven. You will learn, you will transform, and you will be happy because it's you who did the work. It's time to face your fears head-on, so you can't play the victim card anymore. You're capable of great relationships, healthy self-confidence, and of doing something with your life. If you're sick and tired of being stuck, this is your chance to get out of that rut.

Ready to learn to value yourself and live the life that you deserve? Contact Christy Maxey today for your free 15-minute consultation.

Physical-therapy-phone-number Call Us480-600-3003

Free Consultation

Latest News in Maricopa, AZ

Judge rules city of Phoenix’s ‘Clean Zone’ is unconstitutional

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -- A Maricopa County Superior Court judge has ruled in favor of a downtown Phoenix property owner who sued the City of Phoenix’s ordinance that attempted to require a permit for certain residents to place non-Super Bowl-related signage on their property until a week after the big game. On Thursday, a Maricopa County Superior Court judge said the so-called “C...

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -- A Maricopa County Superior Court judge has ruled in favor of a downtown Phoenix property owner who sued the City of Phoenix’s ordinance that attempted to require a permit for certain residents to place non-Super Bowl-related signage on their property until a week after the big game. On Thursday, a Maricopa County Superior Court judge said the so-called “Clean Zone” is unconstitutional. “There is no legitimate government interest in content-based regulation of signs, let alone regulation of signs based on the content preferences of private businesses that are given special privileges by the government,” a portion of the ruling read. The judge gave the city 48 hours to approve or deny Bramley Paulin’s application. He was the plaintiff represented by the Goldwater Institute attorneys.

“I’m relieved the court has ruled against the city’s attempt to let private organizations decide what I can and cannot say on my own property,” Bramley said in a statement released to the media after the ruling. “The city should have never allowed this to happen in the first place: it’s wrong for the government to let the NFL and other private groups censor business owners like me, or any residents of the downtown area.”

Hundreds of people and businesses would have needed a permit from the city and permission from the NFL and Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee to put up non-NFL related temporary signs between Jan. 15 through Feb. 19. City leaders previously told Arizona’s Family that ‘Clean Zones’ are not uncommon surrounding big sporting events like the Super Bowl. Still, many residents expressed concern about their First Amendment rights on their property.

Troy Yazzie is among some business owners who weren’t happy when the city of Phoenix and the NFL announced they were restricting what signs could be put up in windows and storefronts before and after the Super Bowl. “I think businesses should be allowed to operate in a manner that they see fit,” said Yazzie. “To be told, treated like we are children and have to go get things approved by a committee, it doesn’t seem fitting at all.”

Jon Riches, with the Goldwater Institute, filed a lawsuit on behalf of a business owner, claiming the “Clean Zone” violated his client’s right to free speech. “They were trying to control who could say what and where in downtown Phoenix, and that’s just not permissible,” said Riches. “Private parties don’t get exclusive ability to communicate with the public, no matter what agreement they enter into with cities.”

Riches believes the NFL was trying to monopolize any advertisements in downtown Phoenix. He hopes the court ruling changes how the NFL does business in the future. “If other cities and towns are going to be considering these sorts of restrictions that violate our rights, they should be on notice, that’s not going to happen,” he said.

The city of Phoenix released this statement:

Editor’s Note: Arizona’s Family is a broadcast partner of the Super Bowl Host Committee.

Copyright 2023 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Maricopa County battles surge of drug-related deaths in jails

Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone said he plans to purchase scanning machines to detect any possible drugs coming into jails.PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) - After a Maricopa County Detention Officer was arrested for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs into a Phoenix jail, it’s brought light to a bigger issue: an uptick of drug-related deaths in local jails.Lisa Espinoza, a mother of five, was outraged because her son, 31-year-old Larry Ogle Jr., died in his cell at a Maricopa County jail on Jan. 8. She told Arizona’s ...

Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone said he plans to purchase scanning machines to detect any possible drugs coming into jails.

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) - After a Maricopa County Detention Officer was arrested for allegedly trying to smuggle drugs into a Phoenix jail, it’s brought light to a bigger issue: an uptick of drug-related deaths in local jails.

Lisa Espinoza, a mother of five, was outraged because her son, 31-year-old Larry Ogle Jr., died in his cell at a Maricopa County jail on Jan. 8. She told Arizona’s Family he was found Sunday morning “foaming at the mouth.”

Espinoza said she talked to her son two days before his death, and he was ready to turn his life around. “He was happy, he was ready to come home and in his mind he was coming home,” she said. Although it’s unknown at this time if Larry overdosed on drugs, on Wednesday, Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone said drug-related deaths in jails have gone up each of the last five years. “In 2022, 172 inmates were taken to the correctional health services because of drug related incidents 17 of those incarcerated deaths were a result to an overdose of drugs,” Penzone said.

Espinoza says the drug problems in jails need to change, and Penzone agreed. “It’s not acceptable that in an environment with the custody of inmates that we have folks die on our watch,” he said. Penzone announced Wednesday he plans to purchase scanning machines to detect any possible drugs coming into jails. There isn’t an exact date when those machines will be implemented, but the sheriff’s office has already been trying to combat the drug problem.

Penzone said they have seized drugs being mailed to inmates, and all officers are trained to administer Narcan in case of a drug-related incident so that other families won’t suffer the same pain as Larry’s. “He’s loving, kind, always giving hugs and kisses,” Espinoza said. “I miss him and I wish I can hold him and I wish I could bring him home again.”

A car wash is being held at the Aztec Pawn Shop located on Central Avenue and Baseline Road in the plaza with the KFC on Saturday, Jan. 14, beginning at 9 a.m. You can also donate to the family using this GofundMe.

Copyright 2023 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Maricopa Association of Governments executive director Eric Anderson to retire

Eric Anderson, executive director of the Maricopa Association of Governments intends to retire from the agency after 40 years of service.“It is time for me to retire from the best job I have ever had the opportunity to hold. I will be stepping down as executive director of the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) effective July 1, 2023,” Anderson told employees in a written statement announcing his decision. “Whether in the private or the public sector, helping make communities better has been a common theme of ...

Eric Anderson, executive director of the Maricopa Association of Governments intends to retire from the agency after 40 years of service.

“It is time for me to retire from the best job I have ever had the opportunity to hold. I will be stepping down as executive director of the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) effective July 1, 2023,” Anderson told employees in a written statement announcing his decision. “Whether in the private or the public sector, helping make communities better has been a common theme of my career. But the best memories that I will have from my work life will be the experiences I have had with the amazing MAG family.”

Anderson joined MAG, the group assigned with planning the county's transportation system, in 1983 to prepare socioeconomic projections for the region, and was tapped to lead the fiscal analysis unit in 1992, which oversaw management of the MAG Freeway Program. He was named transportation director in 2000 and was appointed executive director in 2018.

“Eric is an outstanding leader and a true champion for this region,” said MAG Chair Kenn Weise, mayor of Avondale, in a statement. “On behalf of the Regional Council and for the residents whose lives have been improved by the work of MAG, I want to thank him for his service.”

Anderson’s work over the years at MAG focused on regional and urban growth, economic development, and economic impact analysis. He focused on the urban form and social impacts of new technology, including autonomous vehicles, and the implications for the regional transportation system.

His most recent work included oversight of a 25-year regional transportation investment plan known as Momentum 2050. Funding for the plan would need to come through an extension of the half-cent sales tax for transportation, which was approved by Maricopa County voters in 2004 as Proposition 400. The current funding expires in 2025.

“The work to extend Proposition 400 will continue and I will be available to provide whatever assistance I can to make sure this region continues to have a world class transportation system,” Anderson said. “Our members and business community understand how critical this is to not only the MAG region, but to the state of Arizona. The MAG staff has no equal in terms of expertise, professionalism and commitment to improving our community,” he said.

In addition, Anderson served as interim CEO for Valley Metro prior to the appointment of Scott Smith in 2016, who retired in 2022. Anderson is member of the Urban Land Institute Arizona Advisory Board, Lambda Alpha International and the board of directors of the Arizona Transit Association.

Anderson said he will work together with MAG member agencies to ensure a smooth transition. The executive committee of the Regional Council, MAG's governing body, is expected to meet in executive session on Feb. 13 to discuss the transition plans and the search for Anderson's replacement, according to a MAG spokesperson.

Read more: How the West Valley's transportation system could evolve over the next few decades

Accelerator helps strengthen dozens of Latino entrepreneurs in Maricopa County

Concepción Jiménez cleans Valley homes for a living, an occupation she has perfected after 20 years of living in Phoenix. Decades of experience in the cleaning industry have allowed her to build up her clientele.But it wasn't until 2022 that she officially established her own cleaning business. According to Jiménez, 47, she was able to do that thanks to Fuerza Local's Latino business accelerator program, offered by Local First Arizona.She was one of 45 Valley entrepreneurs who were celebrated...

Concepción Jiménez cleans Valley homes for a living, an occupation she has perfected after 20 years of living in Phoenix. Decades of experience in the cleaning industry have allowed her to build up her clientele.

But it wasn't until 2022 that she officially established her own cleaning business. According to Jiménez, 47, she was able to do that thanks to Fuerza Local's Latino business accelerator program, offered by Local First Arizona.

She was one of 45 Valley entrepreneurs who were celebrated on Wednesday night at the Versailles Event Center in Maryvale. Jiménez, along with other Maryvale, south Phoenix and Mesa business owners, graduated from the six-month incubator program.

The Fuerza Local accelerator provides free training and resources to Latino small-business owners across Arizona, and is taught in Spanish. It falls in line with the mission of Local First Arizona, a nonprofit that aims to boost local economies by supporting local entrepreneurs.

“We are very happy ― all these entrepreneurs had six months of preparation and we helped them to be ready to grow their businesses,” said Mónica García, senior manager of small-business development at Local First Arizona. “We have entrepreneurs from all walks of life, like food, decorations, construction, bakers — well, all sorts of industries graduating from the course. Imagine the contribution we are making to the state of Arizona."

During the program, participants learn the basics of running a business and slowly develop advanced skills to grow their businesses, creating a firm foundation to achieve their short- and long-term goals. All classes are taught by professionals and subject matter experts.

More than 800 graduates

Local First Arizona has graduated more than 800 Latino entrepreneurs across Arizona since 2013 through the Fuerza Local program. A similar incubator focused on uplifting Black business owners, called We Rise, was launched in 2020 and over 40 leaders have graduated since.

The goal is to build an inclusive and sustainable economy in Arizona, supporting entrepreneurs of color. The programs aim to end long-standing racial wealth gaps and unfair banking and lending practices by connecting Latino and Black business owners with mentors, clients, the community and sources of capital.

"I couldn't be more proud of these graduates. Their hard work and dedication inspire everyone," said Kimber Lanning, CEO of Local First Arizona. "(The program) is helping to shape the future of Arizona, in our rural and urban areas alike. Our heartfelt congratulations to all of these incredible business owners."

A second Fuerza Local graduation was set to take place in Sedona, where Latino entrepreneurs in Sedona and Cottonwood would be celebrated on Friday at the Sedona Performing Arts Center.

According to the latest report from the U.S. census, there is a population of 7,359,197 inhabitants in Arizona, of which 32.3% identify as Hispanic or Latino.

In 2018, there were more than 610,000 businesses in Arizona, of which more than 112,000 were Latino-owned. These companies employed more than 101,000 people, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Minority Business Development Agency.

Getting the tools to help them grow

When the opportunity was presented to her, Jiménez was undecided about signing up for the program. She asked herself: "'Why am I going to take classes if I clean houses? What am I going to learn?'"

Conce's Cleaning LLC, based out of Phoenix, was born during that accelerator program.

“I was pleasantly surprised with the instructor that I got. I am so grateful to him because he was very patient with me. They really helped me a lot with things that I didn't even know and that I needed for my company,” Jiménez said.

Luis Antonio Fuentes Olmos is the owner of Tacos Monkey in Phoenix, near 22nd and Campbell avenues. Through his tacos, he shares his Mexican family's recipe — a fusion of Guerrero, Baja California and Sonora cuisine.

He dreamed of taking his small business to the next level and decided to sign up for the Fuerza Local program.

“I am selling something original, something that we made ourselves, and here they have taught us that there is a Latino community with which we can work together and with which we can do great things if we set our mind to it,” Fuentes said.

Another graduate, Luz Murillo, has lived in Peoria for over two decades after migrating to Arizona from San Luis Rio Colorado, Sonora, Mexico. She sells homemade sweets and has also started catering parties through her business DessertsLu.

"The concern to continue growing was what motivated me to sign up," she said. "I had projects, proposals and I limited myself because I needed permits, licenses." Murillo, 37, said the program's instructors helped her figure that all out.

She'll celebrate two years of owning and growing her Peoria-based business in 2023.

2022 WM PHOENIX OPEN INJECTS MORE THAN $450 MILLION INTO ARIZONA’S ECONOMY

An economic impact study conducted by Arizona State University found the 2022 WM Phoenix Open generated nearly a half billion dollars ($453.7 million) into the state of Arizona’s economy. As part of the total economic impact, the study, commissioned by The Thunderbirds – hosts of the WM Phoenix Open – also reported a total State of Arizona GDP contribution of nearly $280 million ($276.8 million) and an annual employment impact of 4,290 jobs.The study used an IMPLAN model to estimate economic impacts ...

An economic impact study conducted by Arizona State University found the 2022 WM Phoenix Open generated nearly a half billion dollars ($453.7 million) into the state of Arizona’s economy. As part of the total economic impact, the study, commissioned by The Thunderbirds – hosts of the WM Phoenix Open – also reported a total State of Arizona GDP contribution of nearly $280 million ($276.8 million) and an annual employment impact of 4,290 jobs.

The study used an IMPLAN model to estimate economic impacts for the State of Arizona which is a commercially licensed input-output model developed and maintained by the Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc. (MIG) and widely used by professional economists to assess impacts of economic activities on a local economy.

““We’re proud to see our once small golf tournament in the middle of the desert grow into a crucial source for economic development and growth not only in the Phoenix area, but everywhere in Arizona,” said Michael Golding, 2022 WM Phoenix Open Tournament Chairman and current President of Thunderbirds Charities. “We take great pride in the positive experiences we provide our fans, and together with our corporate partners, we will continue to draw all types of visitors and businesses to the Valley.”

The study defined and estimated economic impact as the increase in spending and therefore economic vitality in a community as a result of the existence of an event or organization. For the WM Phoenix Open and surrounding events, this included the expenditures of visitors who identified the WM Phoenix Open as the key factor in visiting Arizona, media from outside Arizona who cover the event, the “organizational spending” by The Thunderbirds, media and event production companies, diverse organizations and businesses involved in operations, event production and activation of sponsorships, plus the indirect and induced multiplier effects.

The study focused on estimating the total gross economic impact (gross output) of the 2022 tournament, which includes the total amount of direct spending by out-of-town visitors and organizations in metro Phoenix, and indirect and induced impacts of those expenditures. For the purpose of the study, a visitor was defined as any individual who does not live in the metro Phoenix area for any portion of the year. As a result, no resident expenditure was used to generate the economic impact estimates. Dual-state residents were excluded from the study.

“The economic impact results reveal the power of professional sports and how a single event can have such a positive impact on a region,” said WM President and CEO Jim Fish. “WM is very proud of what we continue to accomplish together with The Thunderbirds through the WM Phoenix Open for the benefit of the community and the environment. Helping communities thrive and empowering people to live more sustainably is a key priority for WM.”

The Thunderbirds, the PGA TOUR and others associated with the tournament injected an additional $55.4 million in direct expenditures from staging and attending the tournament. These expenses are numerous and include tents and equipment, food and beverage, administration, signage, parking and security, hotel rooms leading up to and during the event for the players, caddies, PGA TOUR employees and out-of-town media, to name a few.

Economic activity of more than $220 million was induced by visitors’ and organizations’ expenditures – up from $195 million in 2017. The total gross output associated with visiting media, PGA participants and all other organizational expenditures is up 68.8% from the previous study. This figure was calculated using the IMPLAN economic assessment software with Arizona specific multipliers. This number is additional impact due to what is referred to as the multiplier effect, or the spending and re-spending of money through the local economy. When the indirect impact is combined with the direct impact, out-of-town media expenditure ($1.7 million) and total organizational expenditure, the total economic impact becomes $453.7 million.

In addition, the economic activity spurred by the event created incremental state and local sales tax revenues. The direct sales tax revenue generated from out-of-state visitors, media, and PGA participants at the 2022 WM Phoenix Open is estimated at $17.6 million. Direct sales tax revenue was estimated to be $13 million, through combined direct fiscal impacts in the City of Scottsdale ($2.9 million), Maricopa County ($1.9 million) and the State of Arizona ($9.3 million).

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
>
Call Now Button

Service Areas