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The world is changing. People are finally learning how to manage their own human experiences. But we can't do it alone. Christy Maxey is here to guide you on the path to a positive, guilt-free life. If you're ready to look inward, find peace, and develop the skills to love your true self, you're in the right place. After all, you've been suffering long enough.

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Latest News in Gold Canyon, AZ

San Francisco, Grand Canyon Ready for Arizona Tip-Off Tournament

GLENDALE, Ariz. - Back on the road for a pair of crucial matchups, the University of San Francisco men's basketball team (2-1) will begin play in the inaugural Arizona Tip-Off tournament on Friday evening as the Dons will battle Grand Canyon (2-0) at Desert Diamond Arena.GAME 4 INFORMATION: Date: Friday, November 17, 2023 Time: 6:00 pm PT/7:00 pm MT Opponent: Grand Canyon (2-0) Site: Desert Diamond Arena Location: Glendale, Arizona ...

GLENDALE, Ariz. - Back on the road for a pair of crucial matchups, the University of San Francisco men's basketball team (2-1) will begin play in the inaugural Arizona Tip-Off tournament on Friday evening as the Dons will battle Grand Canyon (2-0) at Desert Diamond Arena.

GAME 4 INFORMATION: Date: Friday, November 17, 2023 Time: 6:00 pm PT/7:00 pm MT Opponent: Grand Canyon (2-0) Site: Desert Diamond Arena Location: Glendale, Arizona Watch: CBS Sports Network Listen: KNBR 1050 Live Stats: Statbroadcast

DONS AT A GLANCE:

SCOUTING THE LOPES:

SERIES HISTORY: Friday's meeting between the Dons and the Lopes will mark the third meeting all-time between the two programs. Notably, USF and GCU have split their previous two matchups - San Francisco won 68-65 in Las Vegas in Dec. 2020 while Grand Canyon was victorious, 50-49, in Phoenix in Dec. 2021.

TRACK THE ACTION: Friday's game will air live on CBS Sports Network at game time with Jack Benjamin and Matt McCall on the call. The contest will also air on KNBR 1050 as Pat Olson will have the call from Glendale. Live statistics are also available above and via the team's schedule page.

FOLLOW US: For updates and more information on the San Francisco men's basketball program, follow the Dons @USFDonsMBB on Twitter, @USFDonsMBB on Instagram and @USFDonsMBB on Facebook.

MERCHANDISE: Want to dress like the Dons? Get your official San Francisco Dons gear from the University of San Francisco bookstore today! Click here to purchase.

SPONSOR THE DONS: The University of San Francisco Athletics Department would like to acknowledge and thank our sponsor - Nike - for their continued support of USF Athletics. Interested in sponsoring the Dons? Please contact Frank Allocco, the Executive Senior Associate Athletics Director of External Relations, at fallocco@usfca.edu or at (415) 422-4561.

4 rural development projects in Arizona get federal funding

Neon Ranch, one of four major rural development projects in Arizona, is set to receive a $20 million federal loan to construct a 505-site luxury RV resort in Gold Canyon, Ariz. (Neon Ranch Rendering)PHOENIX — Four rural development projects in Arizona are set to receive federal financial assistance to improve infrastructure in state communities, officials announced Monday.The loans and grants will be di...

Neon Ranch, one of four major rural development projects in Arizona, is set to receive a $20 million federal loan to construct a 505-site luxury RV resort in Gold Canyon, Ariz. (Neon Ranch Rendering)

PHOENIX — Four rural development projects in Arizona are set to receive federal financial assistance to improve infrastructure in state communities, officials announced Monday.

The loans and grants will be distributed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in an effort to help residents in rural areas have access to better-paying jobs, refined infrastructure, affordable housing and quality health care.

“Through Rural Partners Network, USDA staff is on the ground listening to those many different voices in rural America and responding with funding and resources that will help people in small towns, rural places and on tribal lands build stronger communities and brighter futures,” U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a press release.

One extensive loan of $22 million is heading to Neon Ranch to construct a 505-site recreational vehicle park in Gold Canyon with various amenities, such as a convenience store, swimming pool and clubhouse.

The borrower plans to rent out RV spaces to longer-term winter visitors and travelers. Ten jobs are expected to be created, the USDA said.

Near southern Arizona, the Tohono O’odham Community College will get a $345,000 grant to boost the solar-generated electric power on the main campus in Sells, furthering cost savings.

There will also be new shaded parking for a quarter of the remaining parking areas.

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, a group of 21 federally recognized Indian Tribes in Arizona established decades ago to promote Indian self-reliance through public policy development, is receiving two grants.

The larger award, for $410,000, will go toward will strengthening managerial, technical and financial capacity of water utilities on tribal lands.

The Inter Tribal Council is also getting a $69,000 grant to train member tribes on how to manage and mitigate solid waste.

The Arizona financial assistance is part of $394 million going to 52 projects in Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, West Virginia and Puerto Rico, the USDA said.

Biden creates a new national monument near the Grand Canyon

President Biden designated a new national monument near the Grand Canyon on Tuesday. The move protects lands that are sacred to indigenous peoples and permanently bans new uranium mining claims in the area. It covers nearly 1 million acres.The president gave remarks at the Historic Red Butte Airfield in Arizona before signing the proclamation and visiting the Grand Canyon."Our nation's history is etched in our people and in our lands," Biden said. "Today's action is going to protect and preserv...

President Biden designated a new national monument near the Grand Canyon on Tuesday. The move protects lands that are sacred to indigenous peoples and permanently bans new uranium mining claims in the area. It covers nearly 1 million acres.

The president gave remarks at the Historic Red Butte Airfield in Arizona before signing the proclamation and visiting the Grand Canyon.

"Our nation's history is etched in our people and in our lands," Biden said. "Today's action is going to protect and preserve that history, along with these high plateaus and deep canyons."

Tuesday's announcement is part of a trip that will include New Mexico and Utah, where Biden is making the case for how he's tackling the climate and economic challenges facing Americans in the West.

In the Grand Canyon, tribal nations and conservationists have been calling for additional protections in the area for years, as KNAU's Ryan Heinsius has reported.

A recent statewide poll showed broad support for the proposal, though local ranchers who have worked the land for generations have concerns. Senior administration officials told reporters that the national monument designation upholds private property rights; it also does not affect existing uranium mining claims.

Still, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, the first Native American Cabinet secretary, called Biden's move "historic."

"It will help protect lands that many tribes referred to as their eternal home, a place of healing and a source of spiritual sustenance," she said. "It will help ensure that indigenous peoples can continue to use these areas for religious ceremonies, hunting and gathering of plants, medicines and other materials, including some found nowhere else on earth. It will protect objects of historic and scientific importance for the benefit of tribes, the public and for future generations."

Haaland called her own trip to the area in May "one of the most meaningful trips of my life."

The new national monument will be called Baaj Nwaavjo I'tah Kukveni Grand Canyon National Monument. According to the Grand Canyon Tribal Coalition that drafted a proposal for the monument, "Baaj Nwaavjo" means "where tribes roam" in Havasupai, and "I'tah Kukveni" translates to "our ancestral footprints" in Hopi.

Biden has created four other national monuments during his presidency — one honors Emmett Till, and the others protect land in Nevada, Texas and Colorado.

But the politics of Biden's Western swing are broader than preservation. It is about emphasizing what the administration has already done to invest in the economy and the climate — because many Americans just don't know about it.

Asked whether this week's trip is about advertising accomplishments, press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters, "We're going to continue to do our jobs and continue to talk about it ... And the hope is that we'll get our message out."

She said support would continue to build for the president as the legislation is implemented around the country. "We'll see, I think, Americans start to feel and see what it is that we have been able to do in Washington, D.C."

And the Biden reelection campaign is counting on it.

Gold Canyon home is collapsing, so why won’t insurance cover it?

GOLD CANYON, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- If your house floods or catches fire, your insurance company will usually accept the claim and pay for any damages. But what happens if your home is caving in?Lynda Hammond and her husband have enjoyed their Gold Canyon home and picturesque surroundings for seven years. “This is one of my favorite places to be in the world outside with the beautiful Superstitions in the background,” Lynda said. “I love the view. I mean, the view sold me on this house, and we would come up here, a...

GOLD CANYON, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- If your house floods or catches fire, your insurance company will usually accept the claim and pay for any damages. But what happens if your home is caving in?

Lynda Hammond and her husband have enjoyed their Gold Canyon home and picturesque surroundings for seven years. “This is one of my favorite places to be in the world outside with the beautiful Superstitions in the background,” Lynda said. “I love the view. I mean, the view sold me on this house, and we would come up here, and the breeze would be blowing.”

But back in December, the couple started noticing issues. Water was leaking in a corner upstairs, and the floor suddenly sloped, dropping a few inches. Cracks appeared, and the flooring on the deck started to buckle. “We called a structural engineer who said to immediately put the beams up,” Lynda said. “They said if we didn’t put those beams up, it most likely, about 90% chance, would have just caved in, taking us with it.”

Lynda is talking about a series of vertical, wooden beams in the middle of the garage that are supporting and keeping the second floor from collapsing. Engineers say a support beam over the garage is too small and is now weakening under the pressure of the home. “That beam in itself is carrying the whole load to the middle section of the house on the second floor,” said Scott Lance, a construction expert who was called in to fix the issue. “And if that was to let loose it would be a catastrophic failure.”

The vertical beams keeping their home from caving in are only temporary until a permanent solution is found. So, Lynda and her husband filed a claim with their insurance company, Farmers Insurance. After all, their policy specifically states that it covers a collapse. “Called the insurance company, figured no problem,” Lynda said. “I mean, you’ve got a collapse here. They told us it’s not a collapse. And that is absurd. It’s a collapse!”

According to Lynda, Farmers Insurance told her the house has to collapse and fall in before they can get involved. Until then, their claim kept getting denied. That’s when Lynda reached out to On Your Side. “I’m hoping by calling you guys that maybe we can get something done because to be honest with you, you’re the first people that have ever listened to us,” she said. “And for that I’m very grateful.”

On Your Side asked Farmers Insurance to look into the issue again. They did and determined the couple’s predicament wasn’t covered. If you look at the policy, it says the collapse must be “sudden” and an “actual and complete falling down.” It goes on to say that the “substantial impairment” of a building structure without a “complete falling down” is not considered a collapse. So, if the second floor had collapsed out of the blue, it likely would have been covered. And since the couple was able to catch it before a total failure, it’s not covered.

That’s heartbreaking for Lynda, whose beloved deck, with its views of the Superstitions, is now too dangerous to use. “It’s frustrating since one of my favorite places in the world is broken, you know?” she said.

Farmers Insurance says if a structural engineer brings them new information, they’re happy to take another look at the claim. Lynda and her husband are now exploring other options to cover the repairs, with a cost that could reach six digits.

Copyright 2023 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Strong monsoon storm rips roofs off Mesa homes; extensive damage seen in East Valley

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — A storm knocked out power and left a trail of destruction for thousands in the East Valley on Wednesday night.Initially, over 43,000 SRP and APS customers in Phoenix, Glendale, the East Valley and Gold Canyon were without power, but APS and SRP crews worked around the clock restoring service. At approximately 5 a.m., just over 3,300 utility customers were without power, an overwhelming majority in the SRP service areas around Mesa. And as the morning went on, crews were able to restore service to ne...

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — A storm knocked out power and left a trail of destruction for thousands in the East Valley on Wednesday night.

Initially, over 43,000 SRP and APS customers in Phoenix, Glendale, the East Valley and Gold Canyon were without power, but APS and SRP crews worked around the clock restoring service. At approximately 5 a.m., just over 3,300 utility customers were without power, an overwhelming majority in the SRP service areas around Mesa. And as the morning went on, crews were able to restore service to nearly everyone with just under 100 customers being affected just before noontime.

A dust storm came in from the southeast, hitting Queen Creek, Apache Junction and San Tan Valley. Then the rain came and hit the East Valley hard. In Mesa, first responders were especially busy with roofs torn off mobile homes and apartment buildings. Palm Harbor Estates, a community near Mesa Drive and McKellips, saw particularly harsh damage. Fortunately, no injuries have been reported, but many residents are waking up to downed power lines and uprooted trees in their neighborhoods. Arizona’s Family reporter Sarah Robinson witnessed extensive damage at an apartment complex just off the Loop 202 freeway. Even air conditioning units were seen blown by the strong winds.

For many others, the monsoon was a welcome sight after nearly a month-long heat wave that’s been hitting the Valley of the Sun. Still, temperatures are expected to bounce back quickly. Arizona’s Family First Alert weather team forecasts a high of 116 degrees on Thursday, with the National Weather Service extending an Excessive Heat Warning through Saturday.

Despite the rain, no measurable rainfall was recorded at Phoenix Sky Harbor, continuing a dry streak for the nation’s fifth-largest city. However, chances for storms are expected to climb as we enter the weekend and into early next week. “This will also likely bring our high temperatures back below 110 for the first time in almost a month by Sunday or Monday,” said First Alert Meteorologist April Warnecke.

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