Life Coach in Gold Canyon, AZ

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The world is changing. People are finally learning how to manage their own human experiences. But we can't do it alone. Christy Maxey is here to guide you on the path to a positive, guilt-free life. If you're ready to look inward, find peace, and develop the skills to love your true self, you're in the right place. After all, you've been suffering long enough.

When you work with Christy, you'll be on a fast track to the truth - no beating around the bush or wasting time. Christy's methods are gentle but firm, compassionate yet driven. You will learn, you will transform, and you will be happy because it's you who did the work. It's time to face your fears head-on, so you can't play the victim card anymore. You're capable of great relationships, healthy self-confidence, and of doing something with your life. If you're sick and tired of being stuck, this is your chance to get out of that rut.

Ready to learn to value yourself and live the life that you deserve? Contact Christy Maxey today for your free 15-minute consultation.

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Latest News in Gold Canyon, AZ

Is sports betting legal in Arizona? It is, and you can now get the latest Arizona sports book promo code, GAME15C

Getty Images Caesars Sportsbook has helped grow sports betting in Arizona since it launched in September 2021. With the fall sports season right around the corner, it is the perfect time for first-time bettors in the Grand Canyon State to check out Caesars Sportsbook Arizona. Right now, Caesars Sportsbook AZ is offering a $1,500 risk-free bet for first-time bettors with the promo code GAME15C, making it even easier to place your fi...

Getty Images

Caesars Sportsbook has helped grow sports betting in Arizona since it launched in September 2021. With the fall sports season right around the corner, it is the perfect time for first-time bettors in the Grand Canyon State to check out Caesars Sportsbook Arizona. Right now, Caesars Sportsbook AZ is offering a $1,500 risk-free bet for first-time bettors with the promo code GAME15C, making it even easier to place your first wager on your favorite sports teams. Baseball games dominate the sports schedule right now, and with the new football and basketball seasons right around the corner, there are ample opportunities to use the new Caesars Sportsbook promo code. You don't want to wait around and let this great offer from Caesars Sportsbook Arizona expire. Download the Caesars Sportsbook app now to starting winning big with Caesars Sportsbook AZ.

Caesars Sportsbook AZ is now offering up to a $1,500 risk-free first bet. That's right, if you are a new registrant who is 21+ and located in Arizona*, you can register, deposit, and make your first bet at Caesars Sportsbook with the code GAME15C and get a risk-free bet up to $1,500 (Terms and conditions apply. See details here. Offer expires 8/1/2022).

To take advantage of this offer, all you have to do is click here to sign up for a Caesars Sportsbook account and you will get a single bet credit if your initial bet doesn't win. You'll have up to 14 days to use your bet on whatever sport you'd like. Remember to use the code GAME15C. Sign up now.

Arizona sportsbooks offer numerous ways for bettors to wager:

Prop bet: If you are looking for a fun way to wager on baseball, a prop bet is right for you. With a prop bet, you can wager on stats like how many strikeouts Arizona's starting pitcher will tally or whether a big-name slugger will hit a home run.

Over-Under: Basketball season will be back before you know it, and the best way to wager on hoops is with an over-under bet. If Caesars Sportsbook AZ sets the total score of a game between Boston and Golden State at 210, you simply wager on whether you think the total of both final scores will be over or under 210.

Outright: Golf is a popular sport in Arizona and there's no better way to wager on it than with an outright bet. You simply wager on which big-name golfer you think will win an entire tournament, and with the biggest events of the season happening right now, it's the perfect time to place an outright bet.

Ready to get started? Click here to get a risk-free first bet up to $1,500 from Caesars (See details here). Remember to use the code GAME15C.

*AZ only. 21+. New users only. Bet amount of qualifying wager returned only if wager is settled as a loss. Paid as a single bet credit. Maximum bet credit $1,100. Bet credit must be used within 14 days of receipt. Promotion ends on 8/1/22. See caesars.com/promos for full terms. Void where prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-NEXT-STEP. Standard text rates may apply.

July 2022 EcoQuest: The Leaf Connection

IMPORTANT:Be sure to include the hashtag #theleafconnection in the notes section of your observation.WHAT TO OBSERVE:Any kind of leaf, whether on the ground, trees, bushes, flowering plants or other spaces in nature that catch your eye. Photograph the whole plant and a closeup of the leaf, if possible.This month’s EcoQuest is in collaboration with local artist Mary Meyer.Mary Meyer creates ceramic wall installations that examine the human connection with nature an...

IMPORTANT:

Be sure to include the hashtag #theleafconnection in the notes section of your observation.

WHAT TO OBSERVE:

Any kind of leaf, whether on the ground, trees, bushes, flowering plants or other spaces in nature that catch your eye. Photograph the whole plant and a closeup of the leaf, if possible.

This month’s EcoQuest is in collaboration with local artist Mary Meyer.

Mary Meyer creates ceramic wall installations that examine the human connection with nature and the environment. The work is driven by her interest in ecology and the many similarities between human and botanical anatomy. She received a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Arizona State University and a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of Arizona, where she received the MFA Fellowship. Meyer lives and works in Gold Canyon, Arizona and is an active member of the metro Phoenix art community. Her work is represented in public and private collections in the US and internationally.

The Leaf Connection is a new community engagement art project developed by Arizona artist Mary Meyer in collaboration with Metro Phoenix EcoFlora.

This project invites participants to use iNaturalist to share images of leaves within the urban desert of metro Phoenix. Join the project for a chance to see your observation come to life. Select observations will be used to inform leaf designs for a large wall installation that will carry hundreds of clay leaves that Mary will sculpt by hand. The installation will be mapped out to reflect the Phoenix metropolitan area and illustrate the diversity of plants and people in our desert home. The purpose of this project is to foster community and connection through art, as well as bring awareness to our natural surroundings.

EcoQuests are month-long challenges that are part of the larger Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project. Learn more by visiting our website.

Look for project happenings, EcoQuest announcements and more in the newsletter, project journal and on social media.

Let’s be social on

Please do not observe indoor houseplants or pets.For your own safety and the protection of plants and wildlife, do not trespass when making observations. Please follow all posted rules and guidelines in parks/preserves and do not enter private property.

Do not remove or move natural materials (plants, animals, rocks).Respect wildlife (do not touch, feed, or disturb animals and keep a safe distance).

Do what’s best for you and your community.

Arizona Office of Tourism: Responsible Recreation in AZhttps://tourism.az.gov/responsible-recreation-across-arizona

The Southwest is bone dry. Now, a key water source is at risk.

SACRAMENTO — California and six other Western states have less than 60 days to pull off a seemingly impossible feat: Cut a multi-way deal to dramatically reduce their consumption of water from the dangerously low Colorado River.If they don’t, the federal government will do it for them.A federal Bureau of Reclamation ultimatum last month, prompted by an extreme climate-change-induced drop in water levels at the nation’s largest reservoirs, reopens years of complicated agreements and political feuds among the co...

SACRAMENTO — California and six other Western states have less than 60 days to pull off a seemingly impossible feat: Cut a multi-way deal to dramatically reduce their consumption of water from the dangerously low Colorado River.

If they don’t, the federal government will do it for them.

A federal Bureau of Reclamation ultimatum last month, prompted by an extreme climate-change-induced drop in water levels at the nation’s largest reservoirs, reopens years of complicated agreements and political feuds among the communities whose livelihoods depend on the river. The deadline represents a crucial moment for the arid Southwest, which must now swiftly reckon with a problem that has been decades in the making.

Despite the oppressive dryness that has plagued the region for more than 20 years, California has, in large part, avoided reductions to its usage of the Colorado River. But now that reservoir levels have fallen drastically, the Golden State may be forced to use less water, a prospect that would only further strain a state that is already asking residents in some regions to stop watering lawns and take shorter showers.

California’s Imperial Valley, with its vast swaths of farmlands, uses more water than its neighboring water districts — and could be a target for much of the cuts. The state will also have to contend with water users in Arizona and Nevada, who face their own sets of limitations and internal pressures.

“You can’t possibly overestimate how hard this is,” said Felicia Marcus, a fellow at Stanford University’s Water in the West program and former chair of the California State Water Resources Control Board. “Each state has their own peculiar set of politics.”

Over the past 20 years, as the effects of climate change have become more apparent, water authorities in their respective states have been able to hammer out agreements on moderate cutbacks. But it hasn’t been enough.

Supplies at Lake Mead and Lake Powell are dangerously low, holding just more than a quarter of their total capacities — and threatening the dams’ ability to generate electricity and provide water to its nearly 40 million users. At its highest level, in the 1980s, Lake Mead could have submerged the Empire State Building up to its top floor. Now, water levels have dropped by nearly 200 feet, or 20 stories, exposing a stark white “bathtub ring” around the rocky walls of the perimeter.

The new reality will force the region to shift away from a water source upon which it has relied for centuries, and, in some cases, make tough choices that are sure to ripple nationwide — such as whether to continue alfalfa farming for cattle feed or switch to more drought-hardy crops. The terms laid out in the coming weeks could offer a new blueprint for how America adapts to the increasingly-difficult realities of climate change.

In Arizona, a state which is supposed to bear the brunt of the cuts under past agreements, Tom Buschatzke, the state’s principal negotiator on matters relating to the Colorado River, said water users want the burden shouldered by other states, too.

“They see, across the basin, benefits to everyone who uses Colorado water in the basin,” Buschatzke said. “And they want an outcome in which there’s some level of equity in sharing the risks that go along with the benefits.”

Regional drought has only made things worse. Last month, the water got so low it revealed submerged human remains that had been dumped in the lake.

Speaking before a Senate committee in June, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Camille Calimlim Touton said the situation is severe, and states will need to figure out a way to cut usage by 2 to 4 million acre-feet in 2023 — which amounts to Arizona’s entire annual intake, if not more.

This kind of prompting from the federal government is fairly common, Marcus said, but states are usually motivated to do whatever it takes to avoid having the Department of the Interior step in with a unilateral decision, which it has legal authority to do. As Nevada’s lead Colorado River negotiator John Entsminger puts it, “the federal government doesn’t have scalpels, they have broad swords.”

Still, negotiations — preceded by a century’s worth of fighting over access — will almost certainly be thorny. Water authorities also face their own political pressures at home, from industries, farmers, tribes and families who will have to reckon with the outcome of their negotiations.

“No one wants to raise their hand and volunteer to take big cuts because then that makes it easier for everybody else,” said John Fleck, a professor of practice in water policy and governance in the University of New Mexico and director of the university’s Water Resources Program.

The fraught situation Western states now find themselves in dates back 100 years to when rights were divvied up.

Under a 1922 compact, the Colorado River states are divided into an upper and a lower basin, with each getting the right to roughly half of the river’s water. The upper basin is controlled by a system of state and local dams, while water to the lower basin is managed by two federal dams: the Hoover Dam outside of Las Vegas and the Glen Canyon Dam on the Arizona-Utah border.

The upper basin hasn’t gotten close to using its full share of the water over the past century, Fleck said, whereas the lower basin, which includes Arizona, Nevada and California — with its vast population and sprawling agricultural lands — has overused its share. The Golden State is the biggest user in the basin, with a right to 4.4 million acre-feet per year. An average California family uses between 1-1.5 acre-feet of water annually.

Powerful water districts in California have senior rights to the river, while Arizona and Nevada have junior rights. But those designations are less likely to matter this time around, given the sheer volume of the requested cut and urgency of the situation at the reservoirs.

“Proportionately, everybody’s going to have big cuts,” Fleck said. “And there’s going to be a staredown, a game of chicken, between Arizona and California.”

Under a 2007 agreement between the seven basin states, any shortages in supply would be borne by Arizona and Nevada first, before California. (Nevada has the smallest claim to the river of the three, whereas Arizona’s entitlement is close to the same size as the Imperial Irrigation District in California.)

Yet another agreement spares California from taking a cut until the water in Lake Mead falls below 1,045 feet.

The federal government expects it to fall to 1,039 by the end of December.

Agreements aside, it wouldn’t be equitable to let Arizona and Nevada bear the full burden of a cut that could be equal to their entire water allocations, said Anne Castle, a senior fellow at the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment at the University of Colorado Law School.

“You can stand on your legal theories and watch the system crash,” she said. “But that doesn’t help anybody.”

Still, there are deeply-rooted convictions about water rights in the West, especially in California.

Of the four water districts in the Golden State with access to the Colorado River, the Imperial Irrigation District — stretching from Joshua Tree National Forest down to the Mexico Border — is by far the biggest, using about 2.6 million acre-feet annually to supply water to 474,000 acres of Imperial Valley farmland and nine communities.

Residents there have long asserted the importance of maintaining their access to the river, the only water source for a region that is one of the nation’s top food producers, and Imperial officials note that the district relinquished some of its water to Los Angeles, San Diego and Coachella Valley nearly 20 years ago.

“It is our lifeblood,” Antonio Ortega, a government affairs and communications officer for the district, said of the river. “We don’t have ground water here in Imperial Valley so all of our water is water that we receive from the Colorado River.”

But with such a large cut looming from the federal government and drought conditions worsening across the West, other water users and river experts say it’s going to be hard for agriculture-heavy regions like the Imperial Valley to avoid a cut.

“It’s just simple math,” said Buschatzke, Arizona’s principal water negotiator. “Setting aside the politics, setting aside arguments over who has priority and not, they’re going to have to be reduced.”

When asked if the district is prepared to take a cut, Ortega said “I think it’s very clear, not just based on the hydrology, but based on the severity of the situation, that everybody is being asked to do their part.”

Any agreement with the Imperial Valley district would likely include action on long-stalled efforts to restore the Salton Sea, a lake that provides important habitat for migratory birds in an arid section of the state, even though the fertilizer-laden agricultural runoff has made it inhospitable to fish and other wildlife.

States need to come up with a plan by August to cut water in 2023, when the Bureau of Reclamation meets to set annual operations for Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

The cuts are in some ways an emergency measure, borne out of an urgent need to keep the dams at Lake Mead and Lake Powell functioning. The Colorado River States are scheduled to renegotiate the wider guidelines by 2025, when the 2007 agreement expires.

But the cuts are not likely to lift anytime soon — or maybe ever. Water levels in the river have fallen since the initial agreement in 1922, and with continued drought in the West, there’s no indication that states will be able to return to their full allocations.

Marcus, at Stanford, sees this round of reductions as overdue after incremental cuts that, she said, haven’t been nearly enough.

“Had we done it earlier, we wouldn’t be as close to the events as we are right now,” Marcus said. “So you need to really get real and have these serious conversations.”

Gold Canyon man fighting $48K medical transport bill

GOLD CANYON, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — Joe Leduc says while walking into his kitchen last summer to get another cup of coffee, he felt a little strange. What he didn’t know at the time was that he was having a stroke and he had to be transported to the nearest hospital. But once there, he didn’t stay long. “After being there for only about 20 minutes, the doctor says, ‘We’re not a stroke hospital,’” Leduc told 3 On Your Side.The decision was made to airlift Leduc to another hospital where ...

GOLD CANYON, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — Joe Leduc says while walking into his kitchen last summer to get another cup of coffee, he felt a little strange. What he didn’t know at the time was that he was having a stroke and he had to be transported to the nearest hospital. But once there, he didn’t stay long. “After being there for only about 20 minutes, the doctor says, ‘We’re not a stroke hospital,’” Leduc told 3 On Your Side.

The decision was made to airlift Leduc to another hospital where he could be treated. Leduc says before he knew it, he was being whisked into a medical helicopter. “You didn’t have any say so?” 3 On Your Side’s Gary Harper asked. “No,” Leduc replied. “I’m lying there on a gurney and the doctor said, ‘Are you ready?’ I was like, ‘Wait a minute, let me see if this is even covered.’”

Joe was treated at the second hospital and eventually released. But then, he started getting a bill from a company called PHI Air Medical which is the company that owns the transport chopper. “How much is the chopper bill?” Harper asked. “$48,582,” Leduc said.

It’s a bill his insurance company didn’t cover, and Leduc says he certainly can’t pay it. So, 3 On Your Side got a hold of PHI Air Medical. After looking into the issue, a spokesperson wrote me an email asking Leduc to fill out a “... special consideration application, to favorably resolve any billing concern.”

In another email, the spokesperson said, “... when patients cooperate and fill out the necessary paperwork, they have very favorable outcomes.” Leduc says that’s good to know because he’s been extremely stressed. “It’s day to day wondering. Is somebody going to file a suit or turn us into collections, and we’ll have to sell our house. We don’t know,” Leduc said.

3 On Your Side asked Leduc to fill out all the necessary forms and he sent them back to PHI Air Medical. Once they review it and make a decision, Harper will let you know in a follow-up news report.

Copyright 2022 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Renaissance festival returns, and with it, workers who depend on 'the circuit'

GOLD CANYON – The Arizona Renaissance Festival & Artisan Marketplace has returned to its home just south of Gold Canyon after a hiatus caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. With it comes the long-running festival’s staples: fun games, big crowds and anachronistic novelties.There’s another group that returned as well – the workers, such as actors, vendors and craftspeople, most of whom rely on Renaissance festivals as their main source ...

GOLD CANYON – The Arizona Renaissance Festival & Artisan Marketplace has returned to its home just south of Gold Canyon after a hiatus caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. With it comes the long-running festival’s staples: fun games, big crowds and anachronistic novelties.

There’s another group that returned as well – the workers, such as actors, vendors and craftspeople, most of whom rely on Renaissance festivals as their main source of income throughout the year.

(Audio and photo by Troy Hill/Cronkite News)

Many follow “the circuit,” which is the series of dozens of Renaissance festivals across the country. Many workers are on the road all year, staying in one place only as long as that particular festival lasts, then moving on to the next.

Jeff Cahill – known as Bathos the Muse when he’s performing his folk and traditional playlist – has been on the circuit for 50 years. It’s his sole income, and when COVID-19 hit, he couldn’t work for 16 months.

“My brother took me in, and I cooked for him and mowed the lawn, so he said I could stay there as long as I want,” Cahill said.

Marian Brock and Vanessa Webb – Sprout and Gerty onstage and online – have been part of the Washing Well Wenches troupe for 10 years. They were in Gold Canyon in March 2020 when the World Health Organization declared the pandemic and lockdowns followed. Both lost their normal work for about a year.

“We were both scrambling to get home,” Sprout said. “We didn’t want to get stuck in Arizona when we don’t live here.”

Gerty even had to cross the border to Canada to get home and had to find another job, working with a friend to get through the global crisis.

(Audio and photo by Troy Hill/Cronkite News)

“Everybody just found their own thing,” she said.

They also started working on online content, which led to their TikTok account gaining a modest following.

Tina Berg, front-counter supervisor for the chocolate shop booth at the festival, has been involved with the shop for several years. She said COVID-19’s impact on her was just as personal as it was for the performers.

“A lifestyle ended,” Berg said. “And I really had to figure out how to be my own boss beyond just working the fair.”

The return of festivals has been welcome news.

“(Being back) feels fantastic,” Cahill said, adding that his favorite parts of the job are “listening to people laugh. Having them applaud. Just playing the music for folks.”

He also described the camaraderie with other performers as a sort of family. Many of them travel to the same festivals and often interact with each other year-round.

Gerty said people are “hungry” to be back in and watching live performances.

Newest Arizona city already facing major water problem before it's even built

A planned development in the far East Valley would add nearly a million people. But where's the water coming from?APACHE JUNCTION, Ariz. — There's a city twice the size of Tucson out in the desert south of Apache Junction. It houses 900,000 people in thousands upon thousands of homes.But it just hasn't been built yet.The area is 276 square miles of empty desert called Superstition Vistas. It stretches from the s...

A planned development in the far East Valley would add nearly a million people. But where's the water coming from?

APACHE JUNCTION, Ariz. — There's a city twice the size of Tucson out in the desert south of Apache Junction. It houses 900,000 people in thousands upon thousands of homes.

But it just hasn't been built yet.

The area is 276 square miles of empty desert called Superstition Vistas. It stretches from the southern border of Apache Junction, down the edge of San Tan Valley, all the way down to Florence, then across to the US 60 and beyond.

It follows the edge of the Tonto National Forest and wraps around Gold Canyon, and then back to Apache Junction.

And for all that area, with all those people estimated to live there upon completion, there's not enough water.

Not yet.

"It is huge," Grady Gammage Jr., a lawyer and water expert with the Kyl Center for Water Policy said. "One of the things we said is this could be the San Fernando Valley of Phoenix."

Gammage Jr. wrote one of the first reports for Superstition Vistas nearly 20 years ago. At the time he predicted the area could house 900,000 people by 2060. It would take some creative water choices, however.

"We can grow another million people or more, frankly," he said. "But we have to start making tough choices."

The problem is that the Superstition Vistas has no dedicated water source, Gammage wrote.

The entire tract of land is in Pinal County, a county so strapped for water that the state has refused to let any development take place that uses groundwater alone.

Arizona state officials said in 2019 that Pinal County didn't have enough groundwater to sustain its forecasted development. So, Superstition Vistas would not be able to use groundwater.

One potential workaround involves a state law that allows developers to use groundwater as long as they replace it by pumping water into other ground somewhere else. Major sections of the West Valley were developed that way.

But Gammage said that's not as popular an idea as it used to be since water is more scarce all over Arizona.

Superstition Vistas was also never farmland, so there's no canal running through it to deliver Colorado River water. Because of that, there are no inherent water rights that go along with the property.

"We always had to remind people, it's a 50-year project," former project manager Mike Hutchinson said. Hutchinson is still involved in Superstition Vistas but now leads the East Valley partnership.

"There's a lot of smart people thinking of ways," he said. "Will it cost more money? Yes."

As of now, there is no plan to supply water to all 900,000 people.

But also, as of now, there's only a four-square-mile area of Superstition Vistas that's under construction.

"This first piece is the launching off part," Apache Junction City Manager Bryant Powell said.

The first phase calls for 10,000 homes built by two developers. Those neighborhoods, Powell said, have been annexed into Apache Junction and the city will provide the water for them. But, that's as far as Apache Junction's water commitment goes.

"We prepared for many years before this land was even going to go to auction," Powell said.

There are still 274 square miles of land left to be developed, and most of that hasn't been sold yet. The state owns it and has been selling it at auction.

But unless someone comes up with a plan, none of that empty land has a guaranteed supply of water.

Catch up on the latest news and stories on the 12 News YouTube channel. Subscribe today.

Last chance: Arizona Renaissance Festival 2022 ends April 3. Here's a guide to the fun

For two years, the Arizona Renaissance Festival fairgrounds in Gold Canyon, about 40 miles southeast of downtown Phoenix, have been bereft of the magic that a 16th-century storybook village brings to the Southwest every year.But on Saturday, Feb. 5, the village of Fairhaven will reopen with about 2,000 medieval storytellers, sword swallowers, folk dancers, artisans and other entertainers when the Arizona Renaissance Festival makes a triumphant return.Many fan-favorite acts and, of course, roasted turkey legs will...

For two years, the Arizona Renaissance Festival fairgrounds in Gold Canyon, about 40 miles southeast of downtown Phoenix, have been bereft of the magic that a 16th-century storybook village brings to the Southwest every year.

But on Saturday, Feb. 5, the village of Fairhaven will reopen with about 2,000 medieval storytellers, sword swallowers, folk dancers, artisans and other entertainers when the Arizona Renaissance Festival makes a triumphant return.

Many fan-favorite acts and, of course, roasted turkey legs will be back at the 50-acre fairgrounds. Here's what you should know about the 2022 fair, including how to get discounted tickets and which acts to look out for.

Phoenix's biggest 2022 events: Country Thunder, Phoenix Open, Ostrich Festival

What days is the Renaissance Festival open?

The fairgrounds open Feb. 5. The fair takes place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends and Presidents Day, rain or shine, through April 3.

The Arizona Renaissance Festival is open on the following dates:

How much Renaissance Festival 2022 tickets cost

Tickets purchased at the gate are $30 for age 13 and older, $27 for age 60 and older with ID, $20 for ages 5-12 and free for age 4 and younger.

You can save $1 per ticket by buying online. Go to https://www.bigtickets.com to buy tickets in advance.

Season passes can be purchased at the box office and cost $95 to $230.

How to get Arizona Renaissance Festival discount tickets

There are several ways to save money on tickets:

Basha's and Food City: Discount tickets are $1 less — $29 for adults, $19 for kids — at Bashas’ and Food City stores across Arizona.

Military discount: Admission for active and former military members is $27 with ID at the box office.

Hall of Frames: This store is offering an online-only discount that can be redeemed by using the code HOFA at https://www.bigtickets.com/events/arizonarenfest/azrf-2022. It is good for one free adult ticket with the purchase of one full-price adult admission on Feb. 4, 6 and 21 only. Get one free child ticket with the purchase of one full-price adult ticket by using the code HOFC. This discount is valid Feb. 26-April 3.

Group discounts: With the purchase of at least 10 tickets, adult admission is $27 and child admission is $17. The organizer receives one free ticket. Tickets should be ordered by 4 p.m. on the Thursday prior to your visit. Go to https://arizona.renfestinfo.com to find the group-ticket order form. For more information, call 520-463-2600.

Must-see performances at the festival

The festival's daily schedule is packed with acrobats, feline performers, folk dancers and fire eaters.

Three jousting matches will take place each day: The princesses' joust is at noon and the princes trot on at 2:30 p.m. The "joust to the death" is at 5 p.m.

Catch the Barely Balanced comedic daredevils "diving through fire, hurling machetes and testing the limits of natural selection" at the Fairhaven Theatre at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. every day. Their fiery extravaganza begins at 4 p.m.

The Lynx Show, featuring sword swallowing, magic and comedy, takes place at the Carnevale Village at 11:45 a.m., 1:15 p.m., 2:45 p.m. and 4:15 p.m.

The Jamila Lotus Dance Carnivale will show off "feats of balance and daring" at 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. at the Dancing Pig Pub.

Acrobat Cirque du Sewer's trained rats and cats will perform their stunts at the Rialto Stage at 11:45 a.m., 1:15 p.m., 2:45 p.m. and 4:15 p.m., with a fire cat finale.

You can find the full daily schedule at https://arizona.renfestinfo.com.

Arizona Renaissance Festival's themed weekends in 2022

Each weekend, the festival invites visitors to partake in a different theme. For those looking to dress up in costume, check https://arizona.renfestinfo.com to find out what each week's costume contest is.

Are masks required to be worn at the fair?

According to the festival's website, the ample outdoor space is conducive to social distancing, and mask use is "recommended of all festival visitors."

"Although the Festival is primarily open-air, it also includes enclosed locations such as shops and close seating performance areas. Shopkeepers may, at their discretion, have a mask requirement with entering their shop," the festival's FAQs reads.

"Regardless of vaccination status, properly worn masks are strongly recommended when indoors, in booths and strongly encouraged in the village lanes, audience seating areas, food lines, when approaching service counters, and any crowded areas where social distancing cannot occur."

Coronavirus spread is still considered "high" in every county in Arizona, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's data tracker.

Arizona Renaissance Festival 2022

When: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, Feb. 5-April 3.

Where: 12601 U.S. 60, Gold Canyon.

Admission: $30, $27 for seniors with ID, $20 for ages 5-12, free for ages 4 and younger.

Details: 520-463-2600, https://arizona.renfestinfo.com.

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Shamrock Foods Company DBA Gold Canyon Meat Company Recalls Raw Ground Beef Products Due To Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, 2021– Shamrock Foods Company, doing business as Gold Canyon Meat Company, a Phoenix, Ariz., establishment, is recalling approximately 6,876 pounds of raw ground beef patties because they may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of hard, white plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.The raw beef patties were produced on Oct. 21, 2021 with lot code “29421.” The following...

WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, 2021– Shamrock Foods Company, doing business as Gold Canyon Meat Company, a Phoenix, Ariz., establishment, is recalling approximately 6,876 pounds of raw ground beef patties because they may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of hard, white plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The raw beef patties were produced on Oct. 21, 2021 with lot code “29421.” The following products are subject to recall:

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 6239” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to restaurant locations in Arizona and California.

The problem was discovered after the firm received complaints from restaurant staff reporting they found hard, white plastic in the beef patty products during preparation.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in restaurant refrigerators or freezers. Restaurants are urged not to serve these products. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Sandy Kelly, Vice President of Corporate Communications for Shamrock Foods Company, at (480) 564-6047 or at Sandy_Kelly@ShamrockFoods.com.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to MPHotline@usda.gov. For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/.

East Valley sees first rain of monsoon season

PHOENIX — Those in the East Valley saw measurable rain Saturday, marking the first storm of Arizona’s monsoon season in metro Phoenix this year.The activity started early in the south and west and spread east as the day continued. 600 AM Radar Update: Widely scattered (very) light showers continue to move northeast into Arizona. A rumble or two of thunder will be possible. Better chance for showers and a few storms across...

PHOENIX — Those in the East Valley saw measurable rain Saturday, marking the first storm of Arizona’s monsoon season in metro Phoenix this year.

The activity started early in the south and west and spread east as the day continued.

600 AM Radar Update: Widely scattered (very) light showers continue to move northeast into Arizona. A rumble or two of thunder will be possible. Better chance for showers and a few storms across eastern Arizona later today. #azwx pic.twitter.com/Puv7fznRlV

— NWS Phoenix (@NWSPhoenix) June 18, 2022

Around 1 p.m., the areas of Gold Canyon and Superstition Mountains saw the most amount of rain, according to the Flood Control District of Maricopa County.

Gold Canyon saw .67 to .98 inches of rain, while Superstition Mountains had 1.02 inches.

Rain was also detected across Queen Creek, south Chandler San Tan Valley and Apache Junction.

Rain gauges by the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport and Apache Junction captured .04 inches of rain, while parts of San Tan Valley and Queen Creek received .35 inches.

Sky Harbor Airport received a trace of rain for the first time on June 18 since 1988. It has not received measurable rainfall on the date since 1967.

Chances for showers and thunderstorms increase to 30% by nighttime with a low of 81 degrees, according to National Weather Service forecasters in Phoenix.

A Flood Advisory was issued around 1:20 p.m. until 5:15 p.m. near Queen Creek and Florence by the NWS.

The National Weather Service in Phoenix has Issued a Flood Advisory. https://t.co/4ZQazUDqTV #azwx #cawx pic.twitter.com/In4mUbl5Pn

— NWS Phoenix (@NWSPhoenix) June 18, 2022

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