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The world is changing. People are finally learning how to manage their own human experiences. But we can't do it alone. Christy Maxey is here to guide you on the path to a positive, guilt-free life. If you're ready to look inward, find peace, and develop the skills to love your true self, you're in the right place. After all, you've been suffering long enough.

When you work with Christy, you'll be on a fast track to the truth - no beating around the bush or wasting time. Christy's methods are gentle but firm, compassionate yet driven. You will learn, you will transform, and you will be happy because it's you who did the work. It's time to face your fears head-on, so you can't play the victim card anymore. You're capable of great relationships, healthy self-confidence, and of doing something with your life. If you're sick and tired of being stuck, this is your chance to get out of that rut.

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Latest News in Gold Canyon, AZ

Arizona Renaissance Festival begins in February in Gold Canyon

Posted Monday, January 8, 2024 8:01 am 36th season of festivalTake a unique trip back in time to the Arizona Renaissance Festival, celebrating 36 years of cheers.It is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 3–March 31 at 12601 E. U.S. Highway 60 in Gold Canyon.Tickets at https://arizonarenfest.bigtickets.com/2024 cost $34 for adults; $32 for seniors 60 and over; and $22 for children 5-12. Children 4 and under are free. The Pleasure Feast, held twice daily, with admission to the festival and a special edition Pleasure F...

Posted Monday, January 8, 2024 8:01 am

36th season of festival

Take a unique trip back in time to the Arizona Renaissance Festival, celebrating 36 years of cheers.

It is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 3–March 31 at 12601 E. U.S. Highway 60 in Gold Canyon.

Tickets at https://arizonarenfest.bigtickets.com/2024 cost $34 for adults; $32 for seniors 60 and over; and $22 for children 5-12. Children 4 and under are free. The Pleasure Feast, held twice daily, with admission to the festival and a special edition Pleasure Feast goblet, costs $100. The Hops Pub Crawl costs $85.

Free parking courtesy of Bashas’ and Food City

Information: https://arizona.renfestinfo.com

Take a unique trip back in time to the Arizona Renaissance Festival Saturdays and Sundays Feb. 3-March 31 at 12601 E. U.S. Highway 60 in Gold Canyon, just east of Apache Junction.

The festival’s 50-acre 16th century European village has 16 stages of nonstop entertainment, music, comedy, falconry, dance, mermaids and acrobatics. Foolish pleasures mix with artisan treasures as you shop, eat and mingle with a cast of nearly 2,000 colorfully costumed characters, according to a release.

New this year: The Hops, a comedic pub crawl, which includes a flight of four pours and a mad silly brew tour with Rowland and Florian — The Renaissance Men. Also new this season: The Reelin’ Rogues, a new music act; and Supernova the Strongwoman, a new act.

Explore the village marketplace with more than 200 storybook shops, studios and galleries filled with unique arts and crafts, handmade wares, kitchens, pubs and games. Also to people-powered rides such as Da Vinci’s Flying Machine, The Slider Joust and Piccolo Pony — a rocking horse bigger than an elephant. There’s The Dragon Climbing Tower, Castle Siege, the Maze, Archery Range and more.

The live jousting tournaments are one of the festival’s most popular attractions. Armored knights on charging steeds take up their lances and battle for the queen’s honor. Cheer on your favorite armored knight at one of the three daily jousting tournaments in a 5,000-seat arena.

In addition to the revelry, the festival offers food fit for a king. Attend the Pleasure Feast and be treated like a true royal while you savor five courses of fine food, ample drink, and enjoy an hour and a half of raucous Renaissance entertainment at its best. The Pleasure Feast, held twice daily, includes admission to the festival and a special edition Pleasure Feast goblet. Advance reservations are recommended.

Food is plentiful and available throughout the village. The menu is diverse with offerings such as steak-on-a-stake, turkey legs, vegetable and meat pies, pastas, bread bowls filled with hearty stews, and more. There are desserts such as crepes, chimney rolls or a variety of other sweet treat surprises.

Go to Arizona.RenFestInfo for tickets and information.

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Strong monsoon storm rips roofs off Mesa homes; extensive damage seen in East Valley

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — A storm knocked out power and left a trail of destruction for thousands in the East Valley on Wednesday night.Initially, over 43,000 SRP and APS customers in Phoenix, Glendale, the East Valley and Gold Canyon were without power, but APS and SRP crews worked around the clock restoring service. At approximately 5 a.m., just over 3,300 utility customers were without power, an overwhelming majority in the SRP service areas around Mesa. And as the morning went on, crews were able to restore service to ne...

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — A storm knocked out power and left a trail of destruction for thousands in the East Valley on Wednesday night.

Initially, over 43,000 SRP and APS customers in Phoenix, Glendale, the East Valley and Gold Canyon were without power, but APS and SRP crews worked around the clock restoring service. At approximately 5 a.m., just over 3,300 utility customers were without power, an overwhelming majority in the SRP service areas around Mesa. And as the morning went on, crews were able to restore service to nearly everyone with just under 100 customers being affected just before noontime.

A dust storm came in from the southeast, hitting Queen Creek, Apache Junction and San Tan Valley. Then the rain came and hit the East Valley hard. In Mesa, first responders were especially busy with roofs torn off mobile homes and apartment buildings. Palm Harbor Estates, a community near Mesa Drive and McKellips, saw particularly harsh damage. Fortunately, no injuries have been reported, but many residents are waking up to downed power lines and uprooted trees in their neighborhoods. Arizona’s Family reporter Sarah Robinson witnessed extensive damage at an apartment complex just off the Loop 202 freeway. Even air conditioning units were seen blown by the strong winds.

For many others, the monsoon was a welcome sight after nearly a month-long heat wave that’s been hitting the Valley of the Sun. Still, temperatures are expected to bounce back quickly. Arizona’s Family First Alert weather team forecasts a high of 116 degrees on Thursday, with the National Weather Service extending an Excessive Heat Warning through Saturday.

Despite the rain, no measurable rainfall was recorded at Phoenix Sky Harbor, continuing a dry streak for the nation’s fifth-largest city. However, chances for storms are expected to climb as we enter the weekend and into early next week. “This will also likely bring our high temperatures back below 110 for the first time in almost a month by Sunday or Monday,” said First Alert Meteorologist April Warnecke.

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Copyright 2023 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Insurance company takes another look at collapsing Gold Canyon home

NewsNew transportation grant hopes to improve safety through connected vehicle technologyUpdated: 9 hours ago|Susan Campbell reports on a new...

News

New transportation grant hopes to improve safety through connected vehicle technology

Updated: 9 hours ago

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Susan Campbell reports on a new Department of Transportation grant to improve safety on Arizona roadways

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Arizona abortion providers navigate between two laws

Updated: 24 hours ago

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State Attorney General Kris Mayes said that a near-total ban on this medical procedure would take effect on June 27. It’s a date many abortion providers in Arizona are watching closely.

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On Your Side recovers $19K for viewers in April

Updated: 24 hours ago

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When you add all of the money On Your Side was able to save or recover for our viewers during the month of April, it amounts to $19,121. And for the entire year so far, it totals $86,456.

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Major retailers not selling weighted baby items; here's why

Updated: Apr. 30, 2024 at 8:07 AM MST

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There are new safety concerns about swaddles and sleep sacks. Susan Campbell reports.

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How to fix credit report issues

Updated: Apr. 26, 2024 at 8:33 AM MST

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Susan Campbell explains how to spot issues on your credit report and avoid being turned down for a loan or paying higher interest rates.

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Jarring video shows security guard attacking Phoenix hotel guest

Updated: Apr. 25, 2024 at 9:47 PM MST

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Jarring surveillance video shows a security guard punching and stabbing a Phoenix luxury resort guest in 2022, raising questions on how he got the job. The popular hotel in downtown Phoenix is accused of not doing enough to properly vet the employee.

Gold Canyon home is collapsing, so why won’t insurance cover it?

GOLD CANYON, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- If your house floods or catches fire, your insurance company will usually accept the claim and pay for any damages. But what happens if your home is caving in?Lynda Hammond and her husband have enjoyed their Gold Canyon home and picturesque surroundings for seven years. “This is one of my favorite places to be in the world outside with the beautiful Superstitions in the background,” Lynda said. “I love the view. I mean, the view sold me on this house, and we would come up here, a...

GOLD CANYON, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- If your house floods or catches fire, your insurance company will usually accept the claim and pay for any damages. But what happens if your home is caving in?

Lynda Hammond and her husband have enjoyed their Gold Canyon home and picturesque surroundings for seven years. “This is one of my favorite places to be in the world outside with the beautiful Superstitions in the background,” Lynda said. “I love the view. I mean, the view sold me on this house, and we would come up here, and the breeze would be blowing.”

But back in December, the couple started noticing issues. Water was leaking in a corner upstairs, and the floor suddenly sloped, dropping a few inches. Cracks appeared, and the flooring on the deck started to buckle. “We called a structural engineer who said to immediately put the beams up,” Lynda said. “They said if we didn’t put those beams up, it most likely, about 90% chance, would have just caved in, taking us with it.”

Lynda is talking about a series of vertical, wooden beams in the middle of the garage that are supporting and keeping the second floor from collapsing. Engineers say a support beam over the garage is too small and is now weakening under the pressure of the home. “That beam in itself is carrying the whole load to the middle section of the house on the second floor,” said Scott Lance, a construction expert who was called in to fix the issue. “And if that was to let loose it would be a catastrophic failure.”

The vertical beams keeping their home from caving in are only temporary until a permanent solution is found. So, Lynda and her husband filed a claim with their insurance company, Farmers Insurance. After all, their policy specifically states that it covers a collapse. “Called the insurance company, figured no problem,” Lynda said. “I mean, you’ve got a collapse here. They told us it’s not a collapse. And that is absurd. It’s a collapse!”

According to Lynda, Farmers Insurance told her the house has to collapse and fall in before they can get involved. Until then, their claim kept getting denied. That’s when Lynda reached out to On Your Side. “I’m hoping by calling you guys that maybe we can get something done because to be honest with you, you’re the first people that have ever listened to us,” she said. “And for that I’m very grateful.”

On Your Side asked Farmers Insurance to look into the issue again. They did and determined the couple’s predicament wasn’t covered. If you look at the policy, it says the collapse must be “sudden” and an “actual and complete falling down.” It goes on to say that the “substantial impairment” of a building structure without a “complete falling down” is not considered a collapse. So, if the second floor had collapsed out of the blue, it likely would have been covered. And since the couple was able to catch it before a total failure, it’s not covered.

That’s heartbreaking for Lynda, whose beloved deck, with its views of the Superstitions, is now too dangerous to use. “It’s frustrating since one of my favorite places in the world is broken, you know?” she said.

Farmers Insurance says if a structural engineer brings them new information, they’re happy to take another look at the claim. Lynda and her husband are now exploring other options to cover the repairs, with a cost that could reach six digits.

Copyright 2023 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

Newest Arizona city already facing major water problem before it's even built

A planned development in the far East Valley would add nearly a million people. But where's the water coming from?APACHE JUNCTION, Ariz. — There's a city twice the size of Tucson out in the desert south of Apache Junction. It houses 900,000 people in thousands upon thousands of homes.But it just hasn't been built yet.The area is 276 square miles of empty desert called Superstition Vistas. It stretches from the s...

A planned development in the far East Valley would add nearly a million people. But where's the water coming from?

APACHE JUNCTION, Ariz. — There's a city twice the size of Tucson out in the desert south of Apache Junction. It houses 900,000 people in thousands upon thousands of homes.

But it just hasn't been built yet.

The area is 276 square miles of empty desert called Superstition Vistas. It stretches from the southern border of Apache Junction, down the edge of San Tan Valley, all the way down to Florence, then across to the US 60 and beyond.

It follows the edge of the Tonto National Forest and wraps around Gold Canyon, and then back to Apache Junction.

And for all that area, with all those people estimated to live there upon completion, there's not enough water.

Not yet.

"It is huge," Grady Gammage Jr., a lawyer and water expert with the Kyl Center for Water Policy said. "One of the things we said is this could be the San Fernando Valley of Phoenix."

Gammage Jr. wrote one of the first reports for Superstition Vistas nearly 20 years ago. At the time he predicted the area could house 900,000 people by 2060. It would take some creative water choices, however.

"We can grow another million people or more, frankly," he said. "But we have to start making tough choices."

The problem is that the Superstition Vistas has no dedicated water source, Gammage wrote.

The entire tract of land is in Pinal County, a county so strapped for water that the state has refused to let any development take place that uses groundwater alone.

Arizona state officials said in 2019 that Pinal County didn't have enough groundwater to sustain its forecasted development. So, Superstition Vistas would not be able to use groundwater.

RELATED: A huge amount of Arizona water is being used on memes, selfies and viral videos. Here's why

One potential workaround involves a state law that allows developers to use groundwater as long as they replace it by pumping water into other ground somewhere else. Major sections of the West Valley were developed that way.

But Gammage said that's not as popular an idea as it used to be since water is more scarce all over Arizona.

Superstition Vistas was also never farmland, so there's no canal running through it to deliver Colorado River water. Because of that, there are no inherent water rights that go along with the property.

"We always had to remind people, it's a 50-year project," former project manager Mike Hutchinson said. Hutchinson is still involved in Superstition Vistas but now leads the East Valley partnership.

"There's a lot of smart people thinking of ways," he said. "Will it cost more money? Yes."

As of now, there is no plan to supply water to all 900,000 people.

But also, as of now, there's only a four-square-mile area of Superstition Vistas that's under construction.

"This first piece is the launching off part," Apache Junction City Manager Bryant Powell said.

The first phase calls for 10,000 homes built by two developers. Those neighborhoods, Powell said, have been annexed into Apache Junction and the city will provide the water for them. But, that's as far as Apache Junction's water commitment goes.

"We prepared for many years before this land was even going to go to auction," Powell said.

There are still 274 square miles of land left to be developed, and most of that hasn't been sold yet. The state owns it and has been selling it at auction.

But unless someone comes up with a plan, none of that empty land has a guaranteed supply of water.

RELATED: 'They've been warning us': Rio Verde Foothills residents prepping for water cutoffs

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