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Latest News in Flowing Well, AZ

2022 Southern Arizona high school football spotlight: Flowing Wells Caballeros

5A Southern: Flowing Wells2021 record: 4-7 overall, 1-4 5A Southern (fifth)2022 record: 1-1Head coach: Brian Hook, 1-1 first season at Flowing Wells and overall. Hook served on the staff of former Flowing Wells coach Mark Brunenkant — who is now the Caballeros’ defensive coordinator — for nine seasons as the offensive coordinator until Brunenkant resigned to become the school’s athletic director in 2019-20. Hook...

5A Southern: Flowing Wells

2021 record: 4-7 overall, 1-4 5A Southern (fifth)

2022 record: 1-1

Head coach: Brian Hook, 1-1 first season at Flowing Wells and overall. Hook served on the staff of former Flowing Wells coach Mark Brunenkant — who is now the Caballeros’ defensive coordinator — for nine seasons as the offensive coordinator until Brunenkant resigned to become the school’s athletic director in 2019-20. Hook is from California with a background in football coaching. He became involved with high school coaching in Tucson through a mutual friend of Brunenkant while teaching at a middle school in the Flowing Wells District. He was a coach of the freshman team last season at Mountain View after leaving Flowing Wells following the 2020 season.

Key returners:

Coaching staff:

Notes: New head coach Brian Hook filled in for Brunenkant for “The Battle of Prince Road” game with Amphi in 2016 when Brunenkant was attending the Air Force Academy’s Parents Weekend to be with his son. Hook spoke to him over the phone right after the 27-26 thrilling win over Amphi in which Carlos Valarezo rushed for 207 yards for the Caballeros. … In Brunenkant’s last season as head coach in 2018, the Caballeros led the 5A Sonoran averaging 35.9 points a game with Hook the offensive coordinator. … Flowing Wells moved to the 5A Southern this season and is grouped with Marana, Sunnyside, Cholla, Nogales and Rincon/University. … Scott Cortese led the Flowing Wells program from 2019 to last season. He is now an assistant coach at Ironwood Ridge. … During Brunenkant’s last five years as a head coach, from 2014 to 2018, the Caballeros went 55-20 with three state-playoff appearances. … The last time Flowing Wells has won a playoff game was in 1994 in John Kashner’s seventh season. … Flowing Wells’ 1975 state championship victory over Snowflake under Larry Hart was selected the No. 4 state title game involving Southern Arizona schools in an AllSportsTucson.com ranking last month.

Keep an eye out for: DE/TE Diego Acosta, Jr. is a developing football player who also wrestles. He had two sacks and a fumble recovery in the 28-7 win over Amphi in the season opener Sept. 2.

FLOWING WELLS 2022 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

ALLSPORTSTUCSON.com publisher, writer and editor Javier Morales is a former Arizona Press Club award winner. He is a former Arizona Daily Star beat reporter for the Arizona basketball team, including when the Wildcats won the 1996-97 NCAA title. He has also written articles for CollegeAD.com, Bleacher Report, Lindy’s Sports, TucsonCitizen.com, The Arizona Republic, Sporting News and Baseball America, among many other publications. He has also authored the book “The Highest Form of Living”, which is available at Amazon. He became an educator five years ago and is presently a special education teacher at Gallego Fine Arts Intermediate in the Sunnyside Unified School District

2022 Southern Arizona high school football spotlight: Amphi Panthers

4A Gila: Amphi2021 record: 5-4 overall, 2-2 4A Gila (second)2022 record: 0-1Head coach: Jorge Mendivil, 31-44 ninth season at Amphi and 112-91 overall in 21st season with stops also at San Manuel and Empire. Mendivil is a 1996 graduate of Arizona with a major in Spanish and minor in Math. He was referred to San Manuel to be its head coach by Warner Smith, a former Miner standout, when he was on the same staff with Smith at Flowing Wells. Mendivil was 2...

4A Gila: Amphi

2021 record: 5-4 overall, 2-2 4A Gila (second)

2022 record: 0-1

Head coach: Jorge Mendivil, 31-44 ninth season at Amphi and 112-91 overall in 21st season with stops also at San Manuel and Empire. Mendivil is a 1996 graduate of Arizona with a major in Spanish and minor in Math. He was referred to San Manuel to be its head coach by Warner Smith, a former Miner standout, when he was on the same staff with Smith at Flowing Wells. Mendivil was 27 at the time. After coaching at San Manuel from 2000 to 2004, Mendivil coached at Empire, opening that school in 2006. He moved on to Amphi in 2014.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS ALLSPORTSTUCSON.COM’S 2022 HIGH SCHOOL PRESEASON COVERAGE

Key returners:

Coaching staff:

Notes: Former Arizona offensive lineman David Watson returns as the offensive line coach for the Panthers. He is the uncle of sophomore running back Jacob Espinoza through marriage. His wife is Arizona softball great Laura Espinoza. Their son David Watson Jr. is a former Amphi standout who was with the Arizona program from 2018 to last season. He transferred to Adams State this season. Laura Espinoza is the Panthers’ softball coach. Her brother Mo — Jacob’s father — is a linebackers/running backs coach with Amphi. … Jacob Espinoza was chosen the AllSportsTucson.com Southern Arizona 4A Freshman of the Year last season after rushing for 456 yards on 74 carries in only eight games (Amphi played a nine-game season and he was out with an injury for one game). Jacob has said that he likes to play on defense more and he is an imposing figure as a linebacker at 6-2 and 215 pounds. … The Panthers must try to replace graduated running backs Kiko Trejo (1,057 yards on 108 carries with 14 touchdowns last year) and Ashton Hayes (490 yards on 82 rushes). … Amphi plays four of its first six games on the road, but the Panthers play three straight region games at home from Oct. 21 to Nov. 4 against Sahuaro, Walden Grove and Rio Rico before ending the regular season at Sahuarita on Nov. 11. … The Panthers have not had a losing season since 2018, going 14-9 over the previous three seasons, including a 4-0 mark in the Covid-shortened season of 2020.

Keep an eye out for: OL/DL Marco Martinez, a 6-3 and 320-pound junior who is only in his fourth season of organized football. A former wrestler, Martinez is determined to further his football career in college.

AMPHI 2022 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

ALLSPORTSTUCSON.com publisher, writer and editor Javier Morales is a former Arizona Press Club award winner. He is a former Arizona Daily Star beat reporter for the Arizona basketball team, including when the Wildcats won the 1996-97 NCAA title. He has also written articles for CollegeAD.com, Bleacher Report, Lindy’s Sports, TucsonCitizen.com, The Arizona Republic, Sporting News and Baseball America, among many other publications. He has also authored the book “The Highest Form of Living”, which is available at Amazon. He became an educator five years ago and is presently a special education teacher at Gallego Fine Arts Intermediate in the Sunnyside Unified School District

Girls Volleyball: Sahuaro over Tombstone to win Flowing Wells Invitational

Sahuaro went 5-0 to capture the championship of the Flowing Wells Invitational on Friday and Saturday. The Cougars beat Tombstone 2-0 in the Gold Championship final. Walden Grove beat Rio Rico 2-0 in the Blue Championship match.The Cougars were led by junior libero Brooklyn Comfort, who was selected to the All-Tournament Team along with Kiersten Schilling of Tombstone, Presley Valdez of Walden Grove, Ariadne Tapia of Rio Rico, Malia Rogers of Willcox,...

Sahuaro went 5-0 to capture the championship of the Flowing Wells Invitational on Friday and Saturday. The Cougars beat Tombstone 2-0 in the Gold Championship final. Walden Grove beat Rio Rico 2-0 in the Blue Championship match.

The Cougars were led by junior libero Brooklyn Comfort, who was selected to the All-Tournament Team along with Kiersten Schilling of Tombstone, Presley Valdez of Walden Grove, Ariadne Tapia of Rio Rico, Malia Rogers of Willcox, Alyssa Mack of Flowing Wells, Rylee Arrington of Sahuarita, Alma Teilon of Desert View and Paulina Orozco of Douglas.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9Tombstone over Douglas, 2-0Flowing Wells over Desert View, 2-0Sahuaro over Walden Grove, 2-1Willcox over Desert Christian, 2-0Nogales over Rio Rico, 2-1Sahuarita over Pueblo, 2-0Flowing Wells over Desert Christian, 2-0Sahuaro over Rio Rico, 2-1Sahuarita over Tombstone, 2-0Willcox over Desert View, 2-0Nogales over Walden Grove, 2-0Douglas over Pueblo, 2-0Flowing Wells over Willcox, 2-1Sahuaro over Nogales, 2-0Tombstone over Pueblo, 2-0Desert View over Desert Christian, 2-0Walden Grove over Rio Rico, 2-0Douglas over Sahuarita, 2-0

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10Tombstone over Nogales, 2-0Rio Rico over Desert Christian, 2-0Willcox over Sahuarita, 2-1Desert View over Pueblo, 2-0Sahuaro over Willcox, 2-0Tombstone over Flowing Wells, 2-1Walden Grove over Desert View, 2-0Willcox over Nogales, 2-0Desert View over Desert Christian, 2-0Douglas over Pueblo, 2-0Sahuarita over Flowing Wells, 2-1Sahuarita over Willcox, 2-0Walden Grove over Rio Rico, 2-0Sahuaro over Tombstone, 2-0

Named one of “Arizona’s Heart & Sol” by KOLD and Casino del Sol, Andy Morales was recognized by the AIA as the top high school reporter in 2014, he was awarded the Ray McNally Award in 2017 and a 2019 AZ Education News recognition. He was a youth, high school and college coach for over 30 years. He was the first in Arizona to write about high school beach volleyball and high school girls wrestling and his unique perspective can only be found here and on AZPreps365.com. Andy is a Southern Arizona voting member of the Ed Doherty Award, recognizing the top football player in Arizona, and he was named a Local Hero by the Tucson Weekly for 2016. Andy was named an Honorary Flowing Wells Caballero in 2019, became a member of the Sunnyside Los Mezquites Cross Country Hall of Fame in 2021 and he was a member of the Amphi COVID-19 Blue Ribbon Committee. He earned a Distinguished Service Award from Amphitheater and he was recognized by the Sunnyside School District and by Tucson City Councilman Richard Fimbres. Contact Andy Morales at amoralesmytucson@yahoo.com

Preview: Flowing Wells vs Paradise Valley

Flowing Wells looks to play road spoiler.Paradise Valley looks to pick up their first win of the year.High school football is back and in full swing in the Valley and week two sees an exciting matchup between the visiting Caballeros and Trojans.The Caballeros come to Paradise Valley 1-0 off a big 28-7 win against the Amphitheater Panthers.The Trojans come home on the other side of the spectrum.They're 0-1 after dropping a close road game last week, 34-32, to the Central Bobcats and will look to bounce back ...

Flowing Wells looks to play road spoiler.

Paradise Valley looks to pick up their first win of the year.

High school football is back and in full swing in the Valley and week two sees an exciting matchup between the visiting Caballeros and Trojans.

The Caballeros come to Paradise Valley 1-0 off a big 28-7 win against the Amphitheater Panthers.

The Trojans come home on the other side of the spectrum.

They're 0-1 after dropping a close road game last week, 34-32, to the Central Bobcats and will look to bounce back in their home opener Friday at 7 p.m.

This is the first time in three years the two schools will play each other. Paradise Valley won the last meeting between the two teams in a lopsided high-scoring affair, 63-30, at home.

If the Caballeros want to win Friday, they are going to have to start with handling Trojans senior quarterback Jaiden McDaniel.

McDaniel threw for 232 yards, three touchdowns, with a completion percentage of 0.634, and two interceptions. McDaniel also led the team in rushing yards with 96.

The next closest to him was senior running back Devon Payton, who ran for only 12 yards.

McDaniel's prime target was junior wide receiver and defensive back Quincy Wright as they tallied 124 yards and one touchdown.

On the flip side, the Caballeros will stick to the ground totaling 142 ground yards in their last game, led by junior middle linebacker and guard Pedro Preciado.

Senior quarterback Alex Madrid ran behind Preciado's blocking for 44 yards and two touchdowns.

Flowing Wells will look for a rebound season after going 4-7 overall, 1-4 in the 5A Southern region, and 3-6 in conference play. The Caballeros finished fifth in the 5A Southern region.

The Caballeros have not had a winning season since 2018-19 when they went 8-2.

Both teams come into the game ranked outside the top 35 of all 5A high school teams in the Valley.

The Caballeros are No. 39, but the Trojans come in ranked No. 43.

Playing at home in front of your home fans is a big confidence booster for any team.

Throw in that it is a home opener, and the sakes for the visiting team get higher.

The Trojans will be hungry for a win after their recent loss, which will force the Caballero’s to stay on their toes.

The pomp and circumstance of a home opener are bound to bring the students and fans to their feet.

Arizona to lose 21% of the state’s annual allotment of Colorado River water in historic cuts

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5/AP) — The federal government on Tuesday announced water cuts to states that rely on the Colorado River, including Arizona, as drought and climate change leave less water flowing through the river and deplete the reservoirs that store it.Farmers in central Arizona will largely shoulder the cuts, as they did this year. Under Tuesday’s reductions, Arizona is expected to lose slightly more water than it did this year, when 18% of its supply was cut. In 2023, it will lose an additional 3%, an aggregate...

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5/AP) — The federal government on Tuesday announced water cuts to states that rely on the Colorado River, including Arizona, as drought and climate change leave less water flowing through the river and deplete the reservoirs that store it.

Farmers in central Arizona will largely shoulder the cuts, as they did this year. Under Tuesday’s reductions, Arizona is expected to lose slightly more water than it did this year, when 18% of its supply was cut. In 2023, it will lose an additional 3%, an aggregate 21% reduction from its initial allocation.

The Colorado River provides water to 40 million people across seven states in the American West as well as Mexico and helps feed an agricultural industry valued at $15 billion a year. Cities and farms across the region are anxiously awaiting official hydrology projections — estimates of future water levels in the river — that will determine the extent and scope of cuts to their water supply.

Water officials in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming are expecting federal officials to project Lake Mead — located on the Nevada-Arizona border and the largest manmade reservoir in the U.S. — to shrink to dangerously low levels that could disrupt water delivery and hydropower production and cut the amount of water allocated to Arizona and Nevada, as well as Mexico.

Arizona is experiencing the largest portion of the cuts announced on Tuesday with 592,000 acre-feet cut from the state’s allocation from the Colorado River. The state will take on 82 percent of the total cuts to allocation slated to begin in 2023.

“It is unacceptable for Arizona to continue to carry a disproportionate burden of reductions for the benefit of others who have not contributed,” Arizona Department of Water Resources Director Tom Buschatzke and Central Arizona Project General Manager Ted Cooke said in a statement following the cuts.

The State of California will not experience any allocation cuts as a part of the plan.

“There’s money and power and there’s a lot of people in southern California and my guess is California is a strong State politically,” Jeffrey Silvertooth, with the University of Arizona Department of Environmental Science, said.

Together, the projections and the deadline for cuts are presenting Western states with unprecedented challenges and confronting them with difficult decisions about how to plan for a drier future.

It doesn’t mean immediate changes overnight. Sarah Porter, the director of the Kyl Center for Water Policy at Arizona State University, spoke with Arizona’s Family reporter Whitney Clark about the water cuts last week. “The Colorado River is not the sole source of water for communities impacted by these shortages. So we don’t need to worry that our taps are going to go dry,” Porter said. “There are backup supplies, there are other sources of supply, but there is just less water available.”

The cuts are based on a plan the seven states as well as Mexico signed in 2019 to help maintain reservoir levels. Under that plan, the amount of water allocated to states depends on the water levels at Lake Mead. Last year, the lake fell low enough for the federal government to declare a first-ever water shortage in the region, triggering mandatory cuts for Arizona and Nevada as well as Mexico in 2022.

Experts believe the cuts are a good step to conserving water from the Colorado River, but they also say the measures set to take effect in 2023 are not enough to bring the system back to normal.

“It’s a step it’s a step in the right direction,” Silvertooth said. “The only problem is the subsequent steps need to happen pretty fast, real fast, because Mother Nature is dictating this to us, and this is where we have to respond.”

The City of Phoenix also has its own Drought Pipeline Project. Learn more about it here.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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