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Latest News in Anthem, AZ

Severe thunderstorm brings heavy rain, blowing dust to Phoenix area

Friday has been filled with ever-changing monsoon-related watches and warnings across Arizona from the National Weather Service.Most of the state, save areas of northeastern Arizona and southeastern Arizona, including Tucson and Nogales, were under a flash flood watch until 11 p.m. Friday night. The National Weather Service has also issued a flash flood watch from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday.Near Phoenix, the National Weather Service had issued a severe thunderstorm warning, the bounds of which include parts of S...

Friday has been filled with ever-changing monsoon-related watches and warnings across Arizona from the National Weather Service.

Most of the state, save areas of northeastern Arizona and southeastern Arizona, including Tucson and Nogales, were under a flash flood watch until 11 p.m. Friday night. The National Weather Service has also issued a flash flood watch from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday.

Near Phoenix, the National Weather Service had issued a severe thunderstorm warning, the bounds of which include parts of Scottsdale, Anthem and Cave Creek, lasting until 4:15 p.m. Friday.

The weather service issued a dust storm watch covering central Phoenix and surrounding areas.

Weather Service meteorologist Jared Heil said anyone who gets caught in a dust storm while on the highway should pull off the roadway early, long before the dust storm reaches its worst visibility.

“If you see the dust storm ahead of you, safely pull off the roadway as soon as possible,” Heil said. He advised people to pull all the way off the highway, not stopping in the emergency lane, and to come to a complete stop, turning all car lights off and taking their foot off the brake, putting the parking brake on instead.

Heil said there is a severe thunderstorm near Scottsdale that is “slowly moving to the west,” which means more flash flood warnings could be possible Friday going into the evening. The thunderstorm is expected to produce a significant amount of rain, up to 4 inches an hour, and strong gusts of wind up to 65 miles per hour, as well as hail in some areas, Heil said.

Heil advised those near Interstate 17 and parts west of it where the weather may not be severe yet to “watch the skies,” as changes in weather could occur suddenly and “go downhill in a hurry.”

As the thunderstorm slowly moves west, the Phoenix area has experienced 13 power outages as of 4:30 p.m., with five of those outages affecting over 1,000 people, according to Arizona Public Service’s outage map. In all, over 5,000 people have been affected by power outages.

Northern Arizona is experiencing heavy rain, with another thunderstorm slowly moving across Flagstaff, National Weather Service radar shows. A briefing from the Flagstaff office said Northern Arizona is at an elevated risk for flooding due to saturated soils in the area.

Tucson is forecast to have some thunderstorms into the evening, according to the National Weather Service’s Tucson office.

The National Weather Service is forecasting thunderstorms all through next week throughout Arizona.

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ProMusica celebrates 20th anniversary with upcoming season

The nonprofit organization ProMusica Arizona is commemorating its 20th performance year of its multigenerational chorale and orchestra with a three-part concert series during its 2022-2023 season.The upcoming season’s concerts feature the orchestra and choir where they will perform sets including patriotic songs, familiar show tunes, holiday music and new tracks. Yvonne Dolby, the executive director of ProMusica Arizona, said there will be “a lot of variety” in the organization’s upcoming season.“T...

The nonprofit organization ProMusica Arizona is commemorating its 20th performance year of its multigenerational chorale and orchestra with a three-part concert series during its 2022-2023 season.

The upcoming season’s concerts feature the orchestra and choir where they will perform sets including patriotic songs, familiar show tunes, holiday music and new tracks. Yvonne Dolby, the executive director of ProMusica Arizona, said there will be “a lot of variety” in the organization’s upcoming season.

“There will be some pieces that are the chorale with an accompanist, and there’ll be some pieces with just the orchestra,” Dolby said. “Then there will be pieces that they do together.”

This season, ProMusica Arizona consists of 50 to 60 choir members and nearly 40 orchestra members. The number of participants is far from the original count ProMusica Arizona started with when it was founded in 2003.

“Seventeen singers got together and wanted to sing and form a choir,” Dolby said. “So, within a few months, there were 50 people in the choir, and then they added an orchestra the next year.”

Dolby said the ages of the organization’s members range from mid-teens to early 80s. The choir and orchestra are mixed with college students, unpaid community volunteers and paid professionals who are actors and musicians. Although there is no maximum or minimum age to join the organization, Dolby said members are required to audition and perform a piece with the artistic director and concertmaster.

“They need to have an intermediate skill level and ability to read music,” Dolby said.

Members must also have an intermediate or advanced playing level to join the orchestra.

The organization receives funding from grants, donors and ticket sales. ProMusica Arizona is also supported by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, which provides grants to help support the arts community and make it accessible to the public.

“Most of our funding comes from individual donors, but we do get a lot of grants from government agencies,” Dolby said. “The Arizona Commission on the Arts gives us grants and we do get corporate sponsorships as well.”

In addition to its concert series, Dolby said ProMusica Arizona also partakes in outreach performances with its women’s ensemble, Women in Song. The ensemble is directed by Patti Graetz and performs at community events, retirement communities and different meetings.

ProMusica Arizona has performed over 275 times for more than 134,000 people. Although its offices are based out of Anthem, the chorale and orchestra perform in Sun City and north Phoenix. Dolby said the organization was looking to expand and cover more of the North Valley when it stumbled upon the American Lutheran Church in Sun City.

“It’s just a fabulous venue there,” Dolby said. “The acoustics are great, and all the equipment is great.”

After uncovering the venue, ProMusica Arizona worked to build an audience and establish its presence in Sun City.

“When we started with the first concert there, we only had 75 people show up,” Dolby said. “We had more people on stage than we did in the audience, and now we attract between 300 and 400 people every time we perform there.”

The chorale and orchestra also perform at the All Saints Lutheran Church in North Phoenix. Each separate concert in its upcoming series will take place on two days, with one performance in North Phoenix and another performance in Sun City.

The series will commence with “Favorites — Past and Present,” which features patriotic pieces including “America the Beautiful” and “God Bless America” during the first half. The second half’s repertoire will continue the theme of nostalgia with show tunes from “Oklahoma” and “The Sound of Music.”

Performances for the first concert of the series will be held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15, in north Phoenix and 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16, at 3:30 p.m. in Sun City.

ProMusica Arizona’s holiday concert, “Christmas Through the Ages,” will occur at 7 p.m Saturday, Dec. 17, in north Phoenix and 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18, in Sun City. Audience members can sing along to “Carol of the Bells” and other traditional Christmas songs at the holiday concert.

“Christmas is typically the most well attended concert because people are in the mood to go to an event and celebrate the holidays,” Dolby said. “It will be music they recognize and then some special arrangements of other pieces.”

The concert series will conclude with the “20th Anniversary Celebration Concert,” which will include the debut of “Saguaro Song,” a suite of five songs created by Arizona composer Craig Bohmler. The songs feature texts from the Canadian author Marion Adler, who uses a saguaro cactus to depict the seasons of life.

“We’ll also do a lot of music that we’ve performed over the years that audiences have really liked,” Dolby said.

The last performances will be held at 7:00 p.m. Saturday, April 1, in north Phoenix and 3:30 p.m. Sunday, April 2, in Sun City.

Dolby said the orchestra and choir have been rehearsing for the upcoming concert series since August. The artistic director of ProMusica Arizona has also been working on the programming for several months. Dolby said the organization is particularly eager to see the performance of “Saguaro Song” during the series.

“We’re really looking forward to doing that,” she said. “It’ll be the world premiere of that piece.”

ProMusica Arizona

3701 W. Anthem Way

623-326-5172

Anthem Veterans Memorial is calling for volunteers

The Anthem Veterans Memorial is proud to announce two new volunteer programs: the Youth Ambassador Program and the adult Admiral’s Club.“Volunteerism is the heart of the Anthem community,” said Elizabeth Turner, AVM programming director. “We hope these new Anthem Veterans Memorial programs will enhance the community involvement with our veterans and the Anthem Veterans Memorial educational programming for the years to come. Local businesses and clubs also are invited to join these volunteer efforts.”...

The Anthem Veterans Memorial is proud to announce two new volunteer programs: the Youth Ambassador Program and the adult Admiral’s Club.

“Volunteerism is the heart of the Anthem community,” said Elizabeth Turner, AVM programming director. “We hope these new Anthem Veterans Memorial programs will enhance the community involvement with our veterans and the Anthem Veterans Memorial educational programming for the years to come. Local businesses and clubs also are invited to join these volunteer efforts.”

Youth Ambassador Program

The Youth Ambassador Program provides youth volunteers to participate in the following activities that support the Anthem Veterans Memorial.

•Art for Veterans. Youth artists of all ages are encouraged to summit original art that honors our veterans. The art may depict the Anthem Veterans Memorial, the military branches, The Great Seal of the United States, veterans and veteran families. It should be patriotic and serve to honor, support and salute our veterans and their families. The art will be photographed for use in future marketing materials for the Anthem Veterans Memorial, including the Veterans Day program, banners, and brochures. All submitted art will become property of the Anthem Veterans Memorial. Art may be submitted to the Anthem Community Council Office.

•Thank You Cards for Veterans. The Anthem Veterans Memorial volunteers give over 2,000 veteran thank you cards to veterans at the Veterans Day ceremony. All students are encouraged to make original thank you cards using common patriotic themes, drawings of the Anthem Veteran Memorial, eagle, flag, military branch seals, etc. Language may include, but is not limited to: Thank you for your service. We appreciate you. Thank you for your service and sacrifice. Happy Veterans Day. We are grateful for your service, etc. Cards may be dropped off to the Anthem Community Council Office no later than Nov. 8 to be given at this year’s ceremony.

•Veterans Day Ceremony volunteers. Youth and/or youth clubs are invited to distribute thank you cards to veterans and ceremony programs to attendees at the Veterans Day ceremony. Teen volunteers are invited to assist in seating, directions and informational guidance at the Veterans Day ceremony. Post Ceremony Volunteers are asked to assist after the Veterans Day ceremony by picking up trash and water bottles in the ceremony location following the ceremony from 11:30 a.m. to noon.

•High School Photographers and Videographers. Videos highlighting veterans and AVM programming are important to the educational outreach. Students’ talents are needed to capture highlights of the Veterans Day ceremony. All photos will become property of the Anthem Community Council for Anthem Veterans Memorial marketing and media purposes, Credit: Name, AVM Volunteer Youth Ambassador.

•Writers for the Salute Our Veterans Program. Aspiring writers are invited to assist in writing veteran focus stories and poetry honoring veterans and their families.

Admiral’s Club

The Admiral’s Club provides adult volunteers to assist in following activities that support the Anthem Veterans Memorial.

•AVM Docents. Docents will be instructed on how to provide tours at the AVM, teach classes to youth visiting the AVM and serve as information sources at the AVM during community events. Classes at the AVM include: Honoring our Veterans, the Symbolism Behind the AVM, POW/MIA Day, Pearl Harbor Day, D-Day and The Great Seal of the United States.

•Sponsorship/Donors. Sponsorship and donations are invited to assist in offsetting the costs of the ceremony.

•Educational Speakers. The AVM is always looking for individuals willing to share their service stories and knowledge about military service with our youth at classes at the AVM or on educational panels.

•Photographers and Videographers. Photographers are needed to capture educational programming and special events at the AVM. Videographers are needed to make original videos on local veterans and AVM educational programming. All video and photos will become property of the Anthem Community Council for marketing and media purposes. Credit: Name, AVM Admiral’s Club Volunteer.

•Gardeners. For those with a green thumb, we invite gardeners to assist in planting or maintaining the AVM flowers.

•Ceremony Assistants. Volunteers are invited to assist in setting up chairs on Nov. 10 at 11 a.m. Additional volunteers are invited on Nov. 11 to assist at the information table, assist in directions or answering questions and to provide information about the AVM. Volunteers are also asked to assist in taking down chairs and stacking them after the ceremony from 11:30 a.m. to noon.

•Sponsorship Acquisition. Volunteers are invited to meet with local businesses and contacts to secure Veterans Day ceremony sponsorship to offset the costs of the program.

If any individuals, clubs, organizations or businesses are interested in volunteering for the Anthem Veterans Memorial or sponsoring the Anthem Veterans Memorial educational programming, please contact Elizabeth Turner at ElizabethTurnerUS@yahoo.com or 623-640-8417. For those participating in the Youth Ambassador Program, art for veterans and thank you cards for veterans can be mailed to the Anthem Community Council Office, 3701 W. Anthem Way, Suite 201, Attn: Communication Department.

The award-winning Anthem Veterans Memorial, a project of the Anthem Community Council, is located in Anthem Community Park. The Memorial was dedicated Nov. 11, 2011, and received Arizona Historic Landmark status six months later. Fundraising efforts and the sale of pavers in the Circle of Honor continue. For more information, visit OnlineAtAnthem.com.

County board approves housing, other projects

PHOENIX — In addition to some lengthy discussions on a few items, the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors approved many development items at a meeting held late last week.The formal meeting agenda included more than 150 items, including eight items on the planning and zoning consent agenda. That agenda was unanimously approved.One of the items on that consent agenda is a request for a special-use permit that’s been on the board’s agenda before.Troy Burleson was granted a permit to use his rural-zoned 4...

PHOENIX — In addition to some lengthy discussions on a few items, the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors approved many development items at a meeting held late last week.

The formal meeting agenda included more than 150 items, including eight items on the planning and zoning consent agenda. That agenda was unanimously approved.

One of the items on that consent agenda is a request for a special-use permit that’s been on the board’s agenda before.

Troy Burleson was granted a permit to use his rural-zoned 4.75 acres in New River for what he calls Desert Hills, an RV and boat storage facility.

Generally located at the northeast corner of Carefree Highway and Central Avenue, Burleson’s property would be subject to a long list imposed by the Maricopa County Planning and Zoning Commission, including not having business hours between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The planning commission recommend approval of Burleson’s revised plan by a 7-0 vote at its June 16 meeting.

Another property making a repeat appearance on a Board of Supervisors agenda was Olive Ranch. That’s a 76-lot, 19-acre housing project owned by AMH Development LLC, in the Glendale area west of the Northern Avenue/Loop 303 interchange.

With 27% open space, the plat has an average lot size of 4,500 square feet and a density of about 4.06 units per acre. The three-tract plan received final plat approval.

Spectrum Acquisition Anthem, LLC was granted a major amendment for its special use permit for a planned expansion. The assisted living center wants to develop 10 additional row-home casitas and parking near Anthem Way and Venture Drive on 1.37 acres in the Anthem area.

The facility is now only one building with 160 units on 6.4 acres.

The proposal complies with the land use designation of multi-neighborhood commercial in the Daisy Mountain/New River Area Plan.

Wireless communication towers in Goodyear and Morristown, a digital billboard along Loop 202 at South McQueen Road in the Chandler area and an RV and boat storage facility near Olive Avenue and Dysart Road in the El Mirage area were other items given the green light with approval on the consent agenda.The board tabled decommissions of five small area plans.

The board also tabled a hearing on a special use permit for use of a 15th Avenue/Irvine Road residence for a cottage industrial industry, but the planning commission staff report outlines 32 bullet-point reasons as to why the SUP application should be denied.

The board approved a de-annexation of a right-of-way strip along the west side of Val Vista Road by the City of Chandler. The 4-acre right of way, which runs from Cloud Road to Riggs Road, which runs in front of Basha High School and other property, is set to later be annexed by the Town of Gilbert.

Jason W. BrooksAssociate Editor@JasonWBrooks2

Jason W. Brooks is an associate editor for the Daily independent.

He covers the Buckeye area and the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors. Brooks is a well-traveled journalist who has documented life in small American communities in nearly all its time zones. Born in Washington, D.C., and raised there and in suburban Los Angeles, he has covered community news in California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Iowa, and Nebraska.

Keywords

Gilbert, Chandler, Olive, Glendale, El Mirage, Basha High School, development, assisted living, Board of Supervisors, Maricopa County

Arizona’s Tallest Fresh-Cut Christmas Tree Arrives in Anthem

Throngs of people pass through the Outlets at Anthem during the holiday season, hurrying from store to store and stopping to marvel at the giant Christmas tree in the courtyard. It’s a stunning sight: a towering, 70-foot fresh-cut evergreen adorned with miles of string lights and thousands of ornaments.At 70 feet tall and 20 feet wide, it is the biggest Christmas tree in Arizona – and has held that title for the past two decades. Though plenty of ...

Throngs of people pass through the Outlets at Anthem during the holiday season, hurrying from store to store and stopping to marvel at the giant Christmas tree in the courtyard. It’s a stunning sight: a towering, 70-foot fresh-cut evergreen adorned with miles of string lights and thousands of ornaments.

At 70 feet tall and 20 feet wide, it is the biggest Christmas tree in Arizona – and has held that title for the past two decades. Though plenty of people gaze at the glittering tree every year, they may not know where it came from or the elaborate process behind its presence.

The tree arrived on November 4 from California on a flatbed truck and was then hoisted into place by an industrial crane. Crews then spent the next two weeks decorating the tree with more than 5,000 ornaments that range from 4 inches to a foot long, and more than a mile of LED lights.

Victor Serrao is the man behind the operation. He owns Victor’s Custom Christmas Trees in San Juan Capistrano, California, which is the No. 1 distributor of real, fully decorated Christmas trees in the world. He specializes in tall trees – ranging from 20 to 150 feet – and employs a team of nearly 70 people who work year-round to prepare each tree for the holiday season.

His passion for pines dates back to the 1950s, when his parents owned a Christmas tree lot and were renowned for their ability to customize any tree. He recalls one customer who requested a flocked tree to match the magenta hue of her hair.

“It grew from there. Banks started finding out about it and they were like, ‘Hey, our motif is blue and silver. Can you get us a tree a little taller and decorate It with those colors?’” Serrao says. They expanded into hotels and ultimately signed a contract with Disneyland, specializing in 100-foot-plus trees. He has been in the family business for nearly 30 years.

This is the 20th consecutive year that the Outlets at Anthem will be home to the state’s tallest Christmas tree. Serrao has overseen the process every year. He is diligent about protecting the environment, so he carefully selects his trees from privately held timber companies in California to preserve nearly 70,000 acres of existing forests.

“Every year, we go up in the summer and I have a guide up there and he communicates with the companies. We go and search for the trees, find them, tag them and, at this time of the year, we cut them.”

The tree in Anthem, which weighs nearly four tons, is held up by a series of industrial wires. Once the guide wires are put in place, the team begins adding additional branches to make the tree look “nice and full,” Serrao says. Then it gets a coat of flame retardant. “It’s got a little green in it to keep it looking fresh. Then it gets all the lights and ornaments and we’re done.”

Serrao says the most rewarding part is seeing people admiring the tree and taking Christmas photos in front of it. Of course, it does not come without challenges. “If you get heavy rain, especially if you’re supposed to spray on this flame retardant, you cannot do anything and it can hinder the schedule of this tree,” he explains.

Thankfully, everything went according to plan this season and the tree is currently on display at the Outlets at Anthem and will be there through early January.

250 W. Anthem Way, Phoenix, 623-465-9500, outletsatanthem.com

Anthem sees improvements to water system

Experts discussed improvements and upcoming projects in the Phoenix Water Services Department as well as Arizona’s water usage and drought mitigation strategies at a March 11 town hall meeting.City of Phoenix Water Services DepartmentJim Swanson is Phoenix’s assistant director of the water services department and has over 30 years of experience in wastewater operations, regulatory water resources and water management. He explained some of the recent improvements and ongoing projects in and around An...

Experts discussed improvements and upcoming projects in the Phoenix Water Services Department as well as Arizona’s water usage and drought mitigation strategies at a March 11 town hall meeting.

City of Phoenix Water Services Department

Jim Swanson is Phoenix’s assistant director of the water services department and has over 30 years of experience in wastewater operations, regulatory water resources and water management. He explained some of the recent improvements and ongoing projects in and around Anthem are in response to growth in the area.

The biggest project has been the installation of a new water main and a new gravity sewer main. The goal of this project is to connect Anthem to the Phoenix water system.

“What we’re currently doing is wielding water through EPCOR,” Swanson said. “We will deliver water to the EPCOR campus … and we’ll put our water into EPCOR storage tanks. Then, they will pump it up their water lines, it goes into a booster station and then we pump it to serve the houses up here. The long term plan is to use that system as a backup, and we will provide water directly to Anthem homeowners on the west side of I-17.”

The installation of the new water main was completed in Fall 2021, though it is not in use yet. Swanson said this was no easy project, as the lines were 24 and 36 inches and sizable trenches had to be dug to install it.

A new gravity sewer main line was also installed in 2021 and Swanson said it is already working today.

“Then, in roughly late summer, we will have our booster station fully operational,” he added. “So what that will do is it will be able to take all of the extra water that’s coming up this new main and we’ll be able to take it and then deliver it to the customers in West Anthem. Once that happens, we will no longer wield our water through EPCOR’s water treatment plant and then up and over, we will actually take our water directly.”

In addition, the booster station has granular activated carbon in the tanks. According to Swanson, GAC works to remove some of the taste and odor issues, as well as solids, in the water. He said this is an advantage that is not commonly seen at booster sites.

Swanson said the goal is to have that completely up and running by the end of the summer.

West Anthem isn’t the only one getting improvements, though. Swanson said another booster pump station will be constructed to serve the new Sendero Crossing residential development being built. He said construction will likely start this year and is projected to be complete in late 2023.

“Additionally, this booster pump station could be expanded in the future,” Swanson added. “As this area develops, this booster pump station would, in the future, be expanded to not only serve Sendero, but also new developments.”

He said the water services department is also keeping an eye on future developments to ensure everyone in the area receives quality water services.

EPCOR Water

Doug Dunham, water resources manager for EPCOR Water USA, has many years of experience in water resource management and environmental management, including 20 years with the Arizona Department of Water Resources.

EPCOR is the Southwest’s largest privacy utility, serving more than 780,000 people in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. According to Dunham, the company sells 78 million gallons of water each day.

“I often get asked, ‘How much water do we have? How much population can we support?’ And I always shock people by saying I don’t know,” Dunham said. “One reason is that, today, we actually use less water than we did in 1957. … our population has grown nearly 600%, our gross economic output is over 2,000% and yet, we use about 1% less water than we did in 1957.”

A contributing factor to this change in water usage was the Groundwater Management Act passed in 1980. It created the Arizona Department of Water Resources to help control groundwater depletion, provide means for allocating limited groundwater resources, develop additional water supplies and preserve groundwater for use in a drought.

“One of the key elements of this is the assured water supply program. We’re the only state in the union that has this type of program,” Dunham said. “It requires a 100-year renewable water supply to be demonstrated for new subdivisions. That has to be shown before the subdivision can be created, before the plat can be recorded and before any block can be sold.”

There is also the underground storage recovery program, which allows for the storage of renewable water supplies for later recovery, such as in a drought. There is enough water saved to serve the demands of Phoenix for 30 years. In fact, EPCOR has a little over 12,580-acre feet of water stored for emergency backup available for use in Anthem.

The Colorado River is under a tier one shortage, which reduces Arizona’s portion of allocated water. Even besides that, Dunham said it became clear that advanced planning had to be done to ensure water was available later.

“We saw that the potential for shortages coming down the road were at a much higher percentage than had historically been observed,” he said.

Confronted with this reality, Arizona, Nevada and California (the three lower basin states of the Colorado River) entered into the Basin Drought Contingency Plan about two years ago. The goal was to take early cuts in water allocations to save water in Lake Mead, where elevation levels trigger declarations of shortages by the Bureau of Reclamation. Dunham said the agreement has been a success.

“With the combination of efforts between the states, Bureau of Reclamation, the various Indian tribes that are participating as well as the environmental nongovernmental entities, it has saved and provided an additional elevation of nearly 20 feet in the total volume of Lake Mead,” he said. “So, it has really pushed off a lot of the severe shortages that we would have suffered from if we continued operating as normal.”

EPCOR has many programs that it is actively applying to its systems to help offset the drought. One of those is maximizing the use of reclaimed water, which is done either through storage or directly for landscape use. Dunham said this is one way to ensure as much groundwater as possible is left where it can be available later in the case of drought. It is also continuing with conservation programs, ensuring backup supplies are available and upgrading the well infrastructure to be used if needed.

According to Dunham, EPCOR also provides programs to help customers with their conservation efforts, such as self-audit kits and leak detection assistance. It also participates in community gardens and offers conservation classes taught at Anthem schools and at the community center.

The next community town hall meeting will be held via Zoom at 9 a.m. Friday, April 8, with speakers from the Maricopa County and Arizona Department of Transportation. For more information, visit daisymountain.org/representativetownhall.html

Marcus King releases Dan Auerbach produced album, Young Blood

Marcus King today released Young Blood, his career defining new album, produced by Dan Auerbach and released on Rick Rubin’s American Records / Republic.His tales of salvation, break up and addiction, draw on some of his lowest moments with drug and alcohol excess, following a crushing break-up. King is open about his challenges with mental health an...

Marcus King today released Young Blood, his career defining new album, produced by Dan Auerbach and released on Rick Rubin’s American Records / Republic.

His tales of salvation, break up and addiction, draw on some of his lowest moments with drug and alcohol excess, following a crushing break-up. King is open about his challenges with mental health and shares he often deals with bouts of mania and depression, which were at the forefront of his mind while making Young Blood. During recording and writing the album, things were so bleak, King believed he was making his last record. King stated,

“I needed to bare my soul, I needed this record to be a mirror into what was going on inside me, the inner torment of being alone for the first time in so long, The come down from the substances and the company I kept to keep me from feeling so lonely.” He continues “'Young Blood' is a closing door to the chapter behind me. I used to be comfortable with the idea of burning out quickly, I was in a rush to say all that was on my heart before it was too late. Now that I’ve found love in life and love in myself I’m learning to more slowly unpack past trauma, Learn from it, write about it and move forward.”

In these darkest moments, King turned to his most stadium sized 70s rock influences, both for musical comfort and also as a foreboding warning. Even at his lowest ebb, he knew that the path ahead, trodden by idols from Jimi Hendrix to Paul Kossoff, was one of impending doom if he continued to push himself to his very limit.

Despite challenging personal circumstances, King has made his most accomplished work to date. The album, which features songwriting collaborations with King, Auerbach and songwriting legends Angelo Petraglia and Desmond Child, noted for their work with everyone from Kings of Leon and Aerosmith.

The record has already received widespread critical acclaim. Jimmy Fallon shared that King “is one his favorites”, before his electrifying performance of “Hard Working Man” on the Tonight Show. SPIN stated, “The music is lean and mean, and King’s vulnerability amid a devastating breakup is on full display”. FLOOD MAGAZINE proclaimed King “fully embodies the gritty rock sounds the songwriter’s always dipped his toes in.” Brooklyn Vegan exclaimed, “If you've got a place in your heart for stuff like The Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd, or ZZ Top, it'd be tough to deny that Marcus truly captures the spirit of that era (and also really shreds.)” Rolling Stone Magazine stated, he “turned a dark period into a blistering rock album.” Billboard declared King’s anthem “Hard Working Man” showcased, “King’s soul-shouting vocal and a wealth of defiance and praise for those giving all they’ve got to their 9-to-5.” Associated Press, stated, “The album is soaked in ’70 rock ’n’ roll.” Nashville Scene profiled King, praising the new record and King’s guitar prowess, stating, “In King’s hands, the instrument sounds dark and desperate and dangerous.”

GRAMMY.com also dropped a live performance video of album track “Pain” created at Auerbach’s Easy Eye Sound Studio, it features acclaimed musicians including Chris St. Hilaire on drums and Nick Movshon on bass. Watch it here: https://mk.lnk.to/grammypushplay

King has been an outlier from the very beginning. A fourth generation musician from Greenville, SC, who learned guitar at age 3 from his blues rock musician father Marvin King. He navigated troublesome school years to quickly become known as one of the most promising young artists of our time. He followed breakout success with The Marcus King Band, with his Auerbach produced 2020 solo album debut, El Dorado. It garnered a GRAMMY® Award nomination in the category of “Best Americana Album.” With unparalleled performance prowess and a dynamic live show, King has sold out historic venues from The Beacon to The Filmore. He has opened for Chris Stapleton, Greta Van Fleet and Nathaniel Rateliff and graced the bills of Stagecoach, Fuji Rock, Rock Werchter and more. He also recently launched his own custom Gibson guitar and signature Orange guitar amplifier, the MK Ultra, which sold out before it even hit the stores.

King recently announced a massive headline US tour, with dates HERE through September and October 2022 supporting the release of his forthcoming solo album, Young Blood. He will be taking his stadium sized sound to esteemed venues across the U.S, including two nights at venues such as New York’s Beacon Theatre and Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium. Neal Francis and Ashland Craft support select dates, and the tour features comedy by Dean Del Ray. Tickets on sale now HERE and a complete list of dates follows below.

King continues to tear up the rulebook with the release of Young Blood, with a timeless sound and a singular voice which set to soon establish him as one of the most soulful vocalists of his generation.

It’s Too Late Lie Lie Lie Rescue Me Pain Good and Gone Blood On The Tracks Hard Working Man Aim High Dark Cloud Whisper Blues Worse Than I Ever Had

TOUR DATESTickets available at marcuskingofficial.com/tour

Sept 9 – The Met – Philadelphia, PASept 10 – The Theater at MGM National Harbor – Washington DCSept 11 – House Of Blues – Boston, MASept 15 – Beacon Theatre – New York, NYSept 16 – Beacon Theatre – New York, NYSept 17 – KEMBA Live! – Columbus, OHSept 18 – Bourbon & Beyond Festival – Louisville, KYSept 20 – HISTORY – Toronto, ONSept 21 – Stage AE – Pittsburgh, PASept 23 – GLC Live at 20 Monroe - Grand Rapids, MSept 24 – The Sylvee – Madison, WI ^Sept 25 – Palace Theatre – St. Paul, MNSept 27 – Egyptian Room @ Old National Centre – Indianapolis, INSept 29 – Ryman Auditorium – Nashville, TNSept 30 – Ryman Auditorium – Nashville, TNOct 1 – The Tabernacle – Atlanta, GAOct 2 – The Tabernacle – Atlanta, GAOct 4 – Stubb's Bar-B-Q – Austin, TXOct 6 – The Van Buren – Phoenix, AZOct 7 – The Wiltern – Los Angeles, CAOct 8 - House of Blue - San Diego, CA*Oct 11 – The Masonic – San Francisco, CAOct 13 – Crystal Ballroom – Portland, OROct 14 – The Neptune Theatre – Seattle, WAOct 15 – The Neptune Theatre – Seattle, WAOct 17 – The Complex – Salt Lake City, UTOct 18 – Mission Ballroom – Denver, COOct 20 – The Pageant – St. Louis, MOOct 21 – Byline Bank Aragon Ballroom – Chicago, ILOct 22 – The Fillmore Detroit- Detroit, MIOct 23 – Agora Theatre – Cleveland OhioOct 25 – The Fillmore Charlotte – Charlotte, NCOct 26 – Avondale Brewing Company - Birmingham, ALOct 27 – The Fillmore New Orleans – New Orleans, LA

Neal Francis, Ashland Craft and comedy by Dean Delray unless festival or otherwise stated.^ Neal Francis and Dean Delray only*Ashland Craft and Dean Delray only

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